Edward Heath

Sir Tom Cowie: Founder of a transport empire

Sir Tom Cowie spent 45 years building up the business which became, to his disgust, "Arriva" buses, and after parting with it in 1993, set out to conquer the world again with a metal-importation warehousing enterprise set in his native Sunderland's old shipyards that now encompasses China and Singapore. Leadership fascinated him, and his judgment proved wrong only in an affair close to his heart, the fortunes of Sunderland football club, to which, while chairman from 1980-86 he disastrously appointed Lawrie McMenemy as manager. McMenemy left in 1987 and the Black Cats were relegated for the first time to the Third Division.

The jacket that defines Britain

Everywhere Mat Snow looks, he sees people in jeans and North Face jackets. Why are we dressed to depress? It's our duty to be flamboyant in times of recession, he argues – not a nation of black-clad Calvinists

Edward Heath: The Authorised Biography, By Philip Ziegler

Ted Heath is remarkable among 20th-century prime ministers in that he held office for less than four years (1970-1974), during which practically everything he tried to do failed dismally. Yet by the single act of taking Britain into the European Community, he left a more decisive legacy than many PMs who enjoyed far longer terms.

Civil servants to help in deadlock

Civil servants will for the first time help Britain's political parties to stitch together a post-election agreement if the general election results in a hung parliament.

What really happened on Bloody Sunday?

Twelve years ago Lord Saville began his inquiry into one of the darkest chapters in the history of Northern Ireland. Now, £200m later, he will finally deliver his report

Andrew Rowe: Europhile MP who served as aide to Edward Heath

Andrew Rowe was an intelligent and independent-minded Conservative who represented Mid Kent in Parliament from 1983 to 1987 and then fought and won the newly created and much more marginal seat of Faversham and Mid Kent despite the Labour landslide in 1997. He belonged to One Nation, The Tory Reform Group and Conservative Mainstream and found himself even more out of tune with William Hague’s Conservative Party than he had been with Margaret Thatcher’s. The nearest he came to office was his period as a PPS, first to Richard Needham from 1992-94, and then to Earl Ferrers (1994-95). A staunch Europhile, he had earlier acted as Edward Heath’s parliamentary aide (1984-87).

Witnessed on the White House lawn, the ups and downs of the special

Until 1940, it did not matter much what the British prime minister and the US president thought of each other. But war made Winston Churchill's uneasy friendship with Franklin D Roosevelt the world's most important political partnership. In December 1941, five days after the attack on Pearl Harbour, Churchill set out by battleship, across an ocean patrolled by German submarines, to be the first British prime minister to spend the night in the White House. Eight storm-tossed days later, he was paid a compliment Gordon Brown would die for. President Roosevelt – who was disabled – was waiting to greet him at the quayside. During his month-long stay Churchill got the Americans to agree that defeating Nazi Germany should be top priority, ahead of the war with Japan. But the relationship was to be fraught with tension. When Roosevelt died in 1945, Churchill did not trouble himself to go to the funeral.

Gareth Malone: Note perfect

He’s the nation’s favourite singing teacher. Women love him. Gay men adore him. And his efforts to turn reluctant state-school pupils into convincing choristers have made him the BBC’s latest – and most unexpected – star. But where exactly did Gareth Malone spring from? And what on earth will he make of our intrepid interviewer's, er... 'voice'?