Hair today: David Cameron with a bouffant style (left) and his current cut

Indyplus politics: Why hair matters so much to politicians

Few get closer to the Prime Minister than his barber, so no wonder Cameron's has been awarded with an MBE. And hair has always been big in politics, explains Andy McSmith

Best behaviour, Winston Churchill?

Would Winston Churchill have failed the Tories' new Google test to seek out past indiscretions?

Well yes, but not just because he wouldn’t know what it was. Would-be MPs are being asked to check their online reputations. Luckily,  Winston never had to

Hamish McRae: Ah, the Callaghan years! PMs ranked by the market's rise

Economic View: By leaving office in June 2007, Tony Blair managed, in stock market terms, to sell at the top

David Cameron was ranked joint fifth in a poll of 8 prime ministers, ahead of only Sir John Major and Gordon Brown

David Cameron fifth in poll of PMs of past 50 years

New survey has the Prime Minister ahead of only John Major and Gordon Brown

The Queen attends a cabinet meeting

It did seem rather a lot of trouble to go to just to acquire a new set of place mats

The Queen became the first monarch to attend a cabinet meeting in peacetime since the 18th century but if you’ve had audiences with prime ministers for as long as she has, you can’t fail to have a view

Labour borrows one nation idea from Benjamin Disraeli

Ed Miliband borrowed a political philosophy from the Tories as he sought to position Labour as an inclusive “one nation” party.

Which one's the president, asks Baroness Ashton ahead of crucial meeting with Serbia's Tomislav Nikolic

Baroness Ashton, head of the European Union diplomatic service, reportedly panicked ahead of a crucial meeting with Serbia's president Tomislav Nikolic because she did not know what he looked like and was fearful of shaking the wrong person's hand.

Tiny Rowland, left, with Mohamed Al-Fayed, to whom he lost the fight for Harrods

Return of the unacceptable face of capitalism?

Sir Richard Needham's resignation from the board of Lonrho brings back bad memories of the group's controversial past

Villain of the piece: Harold Wilson

Seasons in the Sun: The Battle for Britain 1974-1979, By Dominic Sandbrook

If the 1960s were the decade in which the British public fell in love with the consumer society, then the 1970s were the decade in which they discovered that this relationship had to be paid for. "Butskellism", the cross-party economic orthodoxy that dominated fiscal policy for the best part of a quarter of a century, now looks more like an exercise in wool-pulling, deluding yourself into thinking that you could sustain an economy on borrowing, not caring that your manufacturing sector was going down the pan and conciliating the demands of organised labour at any cost. As Dominic Sandbrook shows in the fourth segment of his entertaining history of post-war Britain, the later 1970s were the age in which most of these economic chickens came calamitously home to roost.

Tory party chairman, Baroness Warsi

Diary: Ukip's Tory defectors could be thorn in the side for PM

The UK Independence Party has more reason than any other to complain about the British election system: despite winning 900,000 votes at the last general election it has no MPs. In the European Parliament, which is elected by proportional representation, the party has a dozen MEPs.

Leading article: Beware the curse of the political panda

Alex Salmond has always been renowned as a formidable political operator. Then suddenly, with pandas on the scene, Scotland's First Minister trips over his own feet with an ad describing them as a "gift" and an embarrassing rebuke from the advertising watchdog.

Sir Edward Heath and Lord James Callaghan to be given Westminster Abbey memorials

Westminster Abbey is to honour two former prime ministers from the 1970s with memorial stones.

Former cabinet minister Baron Carr of Hadley dies

Conservative Party co-chairman Baroness Warsi paid tribute today to Tory peer and former Cabinet minister Baron Carr of Hadley, who died aged 95 on Friday.

Sir Tom Cowie: Founder of a transport empire

Sir Tom Cowie spent 45 years building up the business which became, to his disgust, "Arriva" buses, and after parting with it in 1993, set out to conquer the world again with a metal-importation warehousing enterprise set in his native Sunderland's old shipyards that now encompasses China and Singapore. Leadership fascinated him, and his judgment proved wrong only in an affair close to his heart, the fortunes of Sunderland football club, to which, while chairman from 1980-86 he disastrously appointed Lawrie McMenemy as manager. McMenemy left in 1987 and the Black Cats were relegated for the first time to the Third Division.

Charles Morris: Well-liked and highly regarded politician who served as PPS to Harold Wilson

As Opposition Leader and Prime Minister, Harold Wilson was careful about the choice of his Parliamentary Private Secretary. He displayed shrewd judgement, and it was never shrewder than the choice of Charlie Morris in the crucial years from 1970-74. Morris was immensely well-liked across the spectrum of a fractious Parliamentary Labour Party. And he was a reflective colleague, with good judgement about issues and people. He had an unerring "feel" for the Labour movement.

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