News South Sudanese government soldiers wait to board trucks and pickups; a cessation of hostilities agreement in Addis Ababa that should at the least put a pause to five weeks of warfare has been reached

Government and rebel leaders in South Sudan have signed a ceasefire – the first step towards peace in the country after five weeks of violence in which more than 1,000 people have been killed and hundreds of thousands forced from their homes.

A displaced family camp under a tree providing partial shade from the midday sun

South Sudan ceasefire talks delayed

Mediators said it was now unclear if South Sudanese rebels would start face-to-face peace talks with the government on Saturday, dampening hopes of a swift end to weeks of ethnic fighting in the world's youngest state.

South Sudan army soldier mans a machine gun northeast of the capital Juba. Both sides in the conflict are reported to have agreed a cease fire ahead of peace talks

US embassy in South Sudan to evacuate more staff from Juba

The move comes as security continues to deteriorate in the capital

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir, left, shaking hands with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta during a visit to Juba

Leaders push for South Sudan talks as fighting continues in oil-producing region

Fighting persisted in parts of South Sudan’s oil-producing region today as African leaders tried to advance peace talks between the country’s president and the political rivals he accuses of attempting a coup in the world’s newest country.

Children displaced by the fighting in South Sudan

South Sudan: Are we helping to create a country or merely creating ravenous clients for an army of Western experts and consultants?

World View: Is collective hatred of a bully enough to make a nation?

Children displaced by the fighting in South Sudan wait behind the fence of the United Nations Mission facility on the outskirts of the capital Juba. Tens of thousands of refugees have fled the crisis

UN votes unanimously for more peacekeepers for South Sudan amid reports of mass graves, extrajudicial killings and rapes

Reports have moved the UN to action as tensions between ethnic Dinka and Nuer in the world’s newest nation escalate

Turkey named as worst country for jailing journalists – again

More journalists have been jailed in Turkey than in any other country for the second consecutive year, followed closely by Iran and China, according to a media watchdog.

Monty Python's Michael Palin will guest present Radio 4's 'Today' programme this winter

Monty Python's Michael Palin to edit Radio 4's Today programme

The comedian will guest host the show and invite John Cleese on-air

On trial: President Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto are charged over the violence after the 2007 elections

'Going after leaders is anti-African': The continent's heads of state threaten to break away from international court

The African Union's executive council has condemned the International Criminal Court's charges against President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya as "totally unacceptable" and indicated that the continent's leaders could split from the body.

The 40-year-old Ethiopian crossed the line in 1hr 1min 6sec

Haile Gebrselassie breaks record to win Great Scottish Run

The double Olympic gold medallist Haile Gebrselassie broke the course record to win Sunday’s Great Scottish Run half-marathon in Glasgow.

Paperback review: The Lure of the Honey Bird: The Storytellers of Ethiopia, By Elizabeth Laird Polygon

Working with the Ethiopian government, author Elizabeth Laird travelled the country to seek out rural storytellers and document their art. The Lure of the Honey Bird describes those journeys, which took her from the Simien Mountains to the restive Somalian borderlands and on to the walled city of Harar, former refuge of the poet Arthur Rimbaud.

Great North Run: Kenenisa Bekele ready to test Mo Farah on capital streets after win

Ethiopian edges out Briton in Great North Run and seeks rematch in London Marathon

Mo Farah and Haile Gebrselassie meet in the Great North Run

Mo Farah’s greatness on the line against Ethiopian marvels Haile Gebrselassie and Kenenisa Bekele

There have been crossroads in Mo Farah’s life defined by Haile Gebrselassie.

Is this ‘160-year-old’ Ethiopian man the world’s oldest ever person?

Local media reports suggest retired farmer Dhaqabo Ebba's recollections of historical events place his date of birth in the 1850s

Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt delighted with latest win in Diamond League

Jamaican powered through after slow start

Mo Farah wins again – he is such an inspiration and really deserves his medals

Hannah England on the World Championships 2013: It’s no crying shame to be fourth in the world – and it’s given me a goal

Keeping track: It was a bit of a sight with me in tears and Perri in a wheelchair!

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The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
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Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

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The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
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Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
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The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
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