Folk Music

Green Man Festival review: Headliners Kings of Convenience and Ben

The Green Man festival’s Brecon Beacons setting regularly startles with its beauty. The Black Mountains – more like lush green hills – and open sky which tower over its stages don’t dwarf the performers, instead making them feel part of something bigger. A diverse bill leaning towards folk and Americana often rises to the landscape’s challenge.

Goat: Secretive Swedes go global

Daft Punk may be the most successful act since Kiss to make an impact while disguising their identities, but they are not alone. A psychedelic outfit claiming to hail from the backwoods of Sweden have been causing a stir while hiding behind ritualistic masks, and telling an unlikely backstory.

Fairport Convention, Union Chapel, London

"You look far too young for a Fairport Convention gig," bassist Dave Pegg informs us before admitting "We need an interval now as some of us require the restroom."

Album: Various Artists, Electric Eden (Universal)

Given the omissions necessary to a truly definitive account of the Sixties UK folk-rock boom – no Michael Chapman, Roy Harper, Davey Graham or Anne Briggs, let alone Donovan and Cat Stevens – Electric Eden offers a vivid enough account of this magical period of British music history.

James Yorkston, Union Chapel, London

One of the several  rambling, funny tales James Yorkston tells tonight has him bumping into an old acquaintance he hasn't seen for years who, worried he's looking "a bit rough", enquires if he has a job these days. Yorkston, considering his wandering singer's life, allows him to think he's unemployed, just scraping by. He's offered a house-painting job, but can't make it as, dressed in the clothes that had him tagged as destitute, he's playing this gig.

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