Theatre: Bowing before the discreet charm of the bourgeoisie never do the demi-monde by halves

Violetta's a cross-dresser, but who exactly are the other denizens of this demi-monde? Edward Seckerson relishes the detail in Jonathan Miller's new staging of 'La traviata'

Why justice is blind but there are no blind justices

The Lord Chancellor's adherence to a 50-year-old edict shows a lack of vision, according to campaigners

MASTERCLASSES; DOG TRAINING; How to teach young dogs new tricks

Does your dog drag you behind its lead? Race off and refuse to come however much you call? An unruly dog is a menace, but it can be cured with kindness. Moira Paterson joins a class for recalcitrant canines

The train halts. His raised brows ask if this is my stop. It isn't. What's the body language for High Street Ken?

He dashes through the tube train doors a nano-second before they shut. White T-shirt. Faded jeans. Sneakers. Blue gym bag slung over one shoulder. The first thing he does is place the bag on the floor. The second thing he does is look in my direction. Stares. I look away. Then I look back at the very moment he looks back. Glances lock.

THE ART OF CRITICISM: 15 BODY LANGUAGE

TOM PAULIN'S MASTERCLASS

'Charm schooling' for Tube staff cuts assaults

Attacks on Tube staff have fallen dramatically after staff tuition at a London Underground 'charm school'.

REVIEW / An assortment of facts in search of a thesis

DESMOND MORRIS'S project in The Human Animal (BBC 1) is to make us better acquainted with ourselves, a task he begins by making us strange. As a naked man and woman walk through a crowded shopping centre, Morris elaborates on the peculiarity of the 'puny primate'. It is a chimpanzee's view of our inadequacies - oddly protruding nose, inside-out lips, no hair to speak of, gross swellings on the hindquarters. A beastly creature, in short, and so, Morris would argue, accessible to the patient methods of the zoologist - field observation and behavioural studies.

Letter: Why the bells don't ring

HESTER LACEY'S article on why men are nervous and tense on the phone ('The heart of the natter', 8 May) misses an essential point which may account for a lot of male - and some female - telephone apprehension. It's simply that you can't have a real conversation on the phone. You can only exchange words. There's no quizzical expression, no eye contact, no body language - whether starkers or not.

Does gender make the manager?

ALL generalisations are subject to exceptions. And none more so than the one about the great difference between the way men and women run things.

Letter: Too severe a sentence

Sir: The sentence passed on Angus Diggle is appallingly severe ('Solicitor gets three years for attempted rape after dance', 1 October). His career now lies in ruins and, at the age of 37, he is unlikely to find another. He will be shunned socially. His whole life is shattered.

THEATRE / All ears, tongues, hands: Jeffrey Wainwright on Titus Andronicus at the Bolton Octagon.

'ENTER a messenger with two heads and a hand.' Titus Andronicus begins with public oratory and is studded with rhetorical eloquence, but it is mute images such as the one conjured by this stage direction that, for good or ill, really hold the stage. This visual sensationalism makes the play a good, if redoubtable, choice for artistic director Lawrence Till's project of mounting a production by an integrated hearing and deaf company that combines speech, sign language, voice-over techniques and visual stylisation.

THEATRE / Pure shower power: Ibsen's Rosmersholm

AS A means of deterrence, the poster advertising the Young Vic's Rosmersholm would be hard to improve on. Engaged in what looks like an absurd training session (or not-so-dry run) for their watery end in the mill-race, Rebecca and Rosmer are seen embracing, fully clothed, under the sprinkling jet of a shower bath. Francesca Annis's face is tilted ecstatically upwards while Corin Redgrave turns to the camera with a doleful expression that could be on the verge of saying 'This is another fine mess that she's got me into.' Happily, Annie Castledine's interesting account of Ibsen's great play avoids ever living down to this publicity photograph, even if there are one or two moments when it is a close-run thing.
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