News British muslim Maajid Nawaz is the country's most famous former Islamist fanatic

A former activist in the radical Islamic group Hizb ut-Tahrir has been chosen to fight a marginal parliamentary seat for the Liberal Democrats.

Fresh notes on a scandal: BBC4's adaptation of Women in Love has a distinctly female focus

A spot of word-association. What springs to mind when you read the following: DH Lawrence, Women in Love and Lady Chatterley's Lover? It wouldn't be the wildest guesswork to suggest that Women in Love might be twinned with naked wrestling, Alan Bates and Ollie Reed grappling by the fireside in Ken Russell's 1969 movie, or Lady Chatterley with that 1960 obscenity trial. As for Lawrence himself, he has become almost totally synonymous with sex – an earthy, unrestrained, would-you-let-your-servants-read-it kind of sex, that is against the sniggering Carry On tradition of the British psyche. No wonder the French seem to appreciate him more than we do.

Village People: Clegg's remote control

Nick Clegg earned plaudits from the former Liberal Democrat leader Paddy Ashdown for his masochistic decision to appear in a television debate with an audience of 20 students.

Manchester Diary: Keep your enemies close (and your brother even closer)

As Ed Miliband delivers his speech to the Labour Party conference today, he will need to keep in mind that a newly elected leader has only a few days in which to define who he is, or have his enemies do it for him. In his case, the most dangerous enemies are the people who supported his brother.

Jacqui Smith heads list of big-name casualties

Jacqui Smith, the first woman to be home secretary, was one of the best -known sitting MPs to be voted out of Parliament but Glenda Jackson held on with a tiny majority.

Which constituencies to watch: a brief guide to results night

From Brighton Pavilion to Ynys Mon, the key seats to look out for and what they signify

Pandora: You are what you vote: Gillian's political past

How differently things could have turned out. It might not, for instance, have fallen to Jamie Oliver to have renovated our school dinners. And – who knows? – perhaps David Cameron would be campaigning on the platform of free goji berries for all.

First Night: Phedre, National Theatre, London

Mirren's purple patch comes to an end

Glenda Jackson: How to beat the fascists? Build houses ...

There have been few more sickening sights in politics than the spectacle of Nick Griffin celebrating his election to the European Parliament.

DVD: Morecambe and Wise: Series 5 (PG)

At a time when both comedy sketch shows and Saturday night television have reached something of a nadir, it is always comforting to come back to the familiar joys of Morecambe and Wise.

Mirren to tread boards after six-year absence

Dame Helen Mirren is to return to the stage for the first time in six years. The Oscar-winning actress, 63, will star in a three-month run of Jean Racine's 17th-century drama, Phèdre, at the National Theatre.

Brown faces poll setback amid talk of challenge

Gordon Brown suffers a damaging new setback to his faltering authority today, with a poll showing that he is less trusted with the economy than any other leader of a major Western nation.

Paperback: A World to Build: Austerity Britain 1945-48, by David Kynaston

Beginning with a page-long list of what we didn't have ("no supermarkets, no motorways, no teabags...") and did have in 1945 ("heavy coins, heavy shoes, heavy suitcases"), Kynaston deftly combines social surveys with personal reminiscences in this absorbing account. We see modern Britain in embryo. Kynaston quotes Mass Observation reports ranging from Butlin's Filey, where the day began with a sung reveille ("There's a new day a-tumblin' in"), to a survey of views on institutional religion: "It's all right in a way as long as it's not overdone." Due to a mix-up in her exam results, the young Glenda Jackson experienced the "contemptible" attitudes to failure and success in the 11-plus. A select few could enjoy the first TV personalities, such as comedian Richard Hearne and telly chef Philip Harben. Even the BBC's head of audience research couldn't see their appeal: "Magazine programmes are amusing enough, but never of sufficient appeal to warrant turning the set on specially." The new NHS in 1948 made the Manc-hester Guardian worry that welfare would "eliminate selective elimination", leading to an increase in the congenitally deformed. The Mirror's response - "We are leading the world in Social Security" - would have a different implication if it ran today. ......... CH

Remember, Dan, it could have been me

James Hanning recalls boyhood with Daniel Day-Lewis
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A Christmas without hope: Fears grow in Gaza that the conflict with Israel will soon reignite

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Gaza fears grow that conflict with Israel will soon reignite
After 150 years, you can finally visit the grisliest museum in the country

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'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

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Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

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He's behind you, dude!

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Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

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Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

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Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

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Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

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Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

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