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The Diary: Fidos; Johnny Flynn; Dulwich Picture Gallery; Gorillaz; The

Awards season is upon us but forget Colin Firth's Golden Globe-nominated stutter, the year's most prestigious prize has already gone to Albert Clark, a jowly, velvet-skinned star who doesn't utter a word in his film debut. This week, Albert scooped the Best in World award at the Fidos (For Incredible Dogs on Screen) for his turn in Tamara Drewe. The boxer dog played Boss, a role that required him to ride in Dominic Cooper's Porsche, look wearily upon Gemma Arterton's romantic entanglements and, at the film's climax, spark off a deadly stampede of cattle. "Albert's performance was particularly emotive," explains Toby Rose, the founder of the Fidos. "With expressive close-ups, comic timing and all-action chases – it's a performance with range." On the day, Albert was unwell so his understudy Blue collected the prize – a bone-shaped dog tag by Tatty Devine – on his behalf. Other winners included the stars of Due Date (Best Comedy Canine), Robin Hood (Blockbuster Bowser) and Hachiko: a Dog's Story (Historical Hound).

Glastonbury sees Gorillaz evolve into higher beings

The members of virtual band Gorillaz – D, Murdoc, Russel and Noodle – are conflicted beings. Jamie Hewlett and Damon Albarn's imagined narrative for the four piece – as seen in their music videos – shows them torn between their hedonistic urges and seeking spiritual meaning.

Album: Gorillaz, Plastic Beach (Parlophone)

As is now well-known, a vast new continent of non-biodegradable plastic waste is being created just beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean; in Gorillaz's Plastic Beach, it's breached the surface to form an island which serves as the cartoon group's headquarters – a Tracy Island of the imagination, created by consumerism.

Gorillaz tale makes tracks online

A documentary about Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett's virtual band has premiered on an internet and mobile phone website. James Mottram watches the future, and wonders if Hollywood is scared

Album: Martina Topley Bird, The Blue God (Independiente)

Martina Topley Bird's CV of former collaborators is one of the more impressively varied in modern pop: since she was discovered by Tricky way back in the mid-Nineties, her vocals have appeared on records by David Holmes, Mark Lanegan, Primus, The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and Gorillaz, to name but a few.