Arts and Entertainment

Sheryl Crow "Feels Like Home" (Warner Bros)

Ronny Jordan: Guitarist whose version of the Miles Davis classic tune ‘So What’ became an Acid Jazz dancefloor favourite

The Miles Davis standard “So What” has been a modal jazz touchstone for 55 years, providing the harmonic canvas for myriad improvisations and reinterpretations.

Strum as you are: Kurt Cobain

The week in music: Riotous story of how Brixton became a rock fans' nirvana

What is the best gig you've been to at Brixton Academy? Perhaps it's Public Enemy, or The Smiths' final show in 1986? Simon Parkes bought the seminal venue for £1 in 1982 and what stories he has to tell in his new memoir Live at the Brixton Academy: a Riotous Life in the Music Business.

Amadou and Mariam, gig review

Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow

Cass McCombs, gig review: 'High-quality material pours forth'

Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Album reviews: Lincoln Durham, Boy & Bear, Run The Jewels, Benjamin Clementine, Howe Gelb

Lincoln Durham, "Exodus of the Deemed Unrighteous" (Droog)

Album review: Bruce Springsteen, 'High Hopes' (Columbia)

A few low notes but the Boss has still got it covered

Hall at the 50th Monterey Jazz Festival in 2007, with Geoffrey Keezer on piano

Jim Hall: Jazz guitarist whose subtly powerful style led Pat Metheny to acclaim him as 'the father of modern guitar playing'

It seems banal to say of an artist that he was a nice person with a great sense of humour. But every comment about Jim Hall, following his death at 83, has emphasised his personal qualities. The veteran bassist Bill Crow described Hall as "A dear friend, a great musician, and one of the best laughers I've ever known. Early in the days of knowing him, he laughed so hard at something [Bob] Brookmeyer and I were saying that he dislocated his left shoulder." Not the best outcome for a guitarist.

A new Johnny Cash album will be released in March 2014

Lost Johnny Cash album set for release in 2014

A collection of unheard country tracks will hit shops in March next year

Flair's 'Dust My Rhythm & Blues'

Dust My Rhythm & Blues, album review: 'Lyrics that will have you crying into your beer'

Flair's remastered original is brash, beguiling and best played loud

Kim Wilde: The pop-singer-turned-gardener-turned-pop-singer talks Elvis, trees and drunken singalongs

I was profoundly affected by music from a very young age As a toddler I used to sit and weep every time Coronation Street came on TV; it had such a sad theme tune that it broke my heart every time.

Napalm Death perform at Hammerfest 2010

Napalm Death gig threatens structure of historic De La Warr Pavilion

The V&A previously cancelled a Napalm Death gig due to concerns that the high level of decibels would damage the historic museum

Album review: Josephine Foster, I'm a Dreamer, Fire Records

This Spain and Colorado-based singer-songwriter’s wavering ethereal voice hangs in the air like cigar smoke and is curiously reminiscent of the theremin. It’s the perfect vehicle for carrying her timeless songs, which mix Tin Pan Alley jauntiness with New Orleans swing, then throws in a dash of country melancholy so that you never know quite where you are.

Music review: The Saints, The Borderline, London

The Saints have big-name fans. Bruce Springsteen covered their “Just Like Fire Would” every night of a recent tour, and Bob Geldof said only three bands changed rock in the Seventies – the Pistols, the Ramones and The Saints. Like the Pistols, the Saints were spat out by an uncomprehending EMI, but they kept going, and here they were promoting an excellent 14th album, King of the Sun.

Album review: Keith Jarrett, No End (ECM)

He never took drugs, Jarrett writes in the sleeve notes to this double CD of previously unreleased private studio recordings from 1986, but otherwise happily participated in the Haight-Ashbury summer of love, whose melody lingers on.

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