Arts and Entertainment

'A marriage ending feels like a bomb going off'

Once tragically uncool, white shoes are the chic choice this summer

How White Shoes Cleaned Up Their Act

Once tragically uncool, they are the chic choice this summer, says Naomi Attwood

Google Doodle honours Sir Norman Parkinson - one of Britain's most celebrated portrait and fashion photographers

Parkinson, who was born on this day in 1913 and died in 1990, is widely credited with revolutionising the world of British fashion photography

How We Met: Nicky Haslam & Tony Glenville

'I know the name of every leading lady from the talkies on, which turned into this silly game'

Daphne Grow, left, and, right, Dakota Fanning photographed by Karl Lagerfeld in the 'Little Black Jacket'

Forget the dress – Lagerfeld just can't get enough of Chanel's Little Black Jacket

Exhibition celebrating a design classic opens in London

Emma Watson scared to act angry

Emma Watson "almost broke down in tears" when she was asked to act angrily.

Eyewitness, Royal Academy, London

If, before visiting this exhibition, you don't have a strong sense of 20th-century Hungarian photography, that is probably because the most important photographers from Hungary were actually positioned across the globe, at the helms of their various practices – fashion, portraiture, documentary, conceptual and photojournalism – in New York, Paris, London and other cities. This instructive exhibition makes the case that the history of photography was shaped to a large degree by practitioners from Hungary, focusing on five key players; and it functions both as an eyewitness history of the 20th century told through images and the tracing of a brave experimental artistic medium. So, whilst László Moholy-Nagy was experimenting with abstract photography at the Bauhaus, Robert Capa was capturing the bloodshed of war. Brassaï was in Picasso's studio or capturing the sleazy nightlife of Paris in the 1930s, whilst Martin Munkácsi was injecting athleticism into the fashion photography at Harper's Bazaar in New York and André Kertész was experimenting with surrealism, narrative and abstraction in his images as he moved around Europe.

Britney Spears: 'I'm pretty normal'

Britney Spears claims she is "pretty normal".

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: This is still a man's world

There are men in parliament who cannot accept that they have to share space with politicians in bras

Natalie Massenet: The queen of e-tail

The pioneering founder of Net-a-Porter transformed online fashion by giving women exactly what they want. With the imminent launch of her website for men, she might just do it all over again

Diary: From cover girl to bag lady

Gossip Girl star Blake Lively is to be the new face of Chanel's "Mademoiselle" handbag line, after she was introduced to Karl Lagerfeld by Vogue editor Anna Wintour. "I will always feel [the bag] is more than just a purse," Lively mused. "It's a quilted case full of lipstick, love letters and the dreams and possibilities that I have always felt every time I see that beautiful CC."

Popular culture goes back to the Thirties

Suddenly, austerity – and its twin, nostalgia – are breaking out all over

Stylist with the key to Lady Gaga's wardrobe

Nicola Formichetti's British Fashion Awards triumph is a belated nod to the industry's unsung heroes

Actress Emma Thompson honoured as female role model

Emma Thompson, Florence Welch and Sam Taylor-Wood have been named Women of the Year.

Carola Long: 'Diana Vreeland’s deliciously decadent pronouncements turned her into a legendary fashion editor'

"Why don't you rinse your blond child's hair in dead champagne, to keep its gold, as they do in France?" It was this kind of deliciously decadent pronouncement that helped turn Diana Vreeland into a legendary fashion editor. The advice first appeared alongside other grand suggestions in her regular column called Why Don't You...? in US Harper's Bazaar where Vreeland was editor from the mid- Thirties through to1962, when she moved to US Vogue.

Anna Wintour: 'Being fired? it was my lucky break'

The US 'Vogue' editor says being sacked is a blessing. Is she right?
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent