Voices

The top 20 of The Stage newspaper’s recently published “power list” of the 100 most influential people in British theatre made for fascinating reading. Most of the usual suspects were there, but many of them found themselves paired with another name for their entry. For it’s not only the artistic directors, the Nick Hytners and Gregory Dorans, who are celebrated but their all-important executive directors, the men and women who oversee every aspect of an organisation except what goes on its stages. Without executive directors, no contracts would be written, no money raised and no ambitious building projects undertaken.

Thomas Hitzlsperger has thrust the issue of homosexuality in football back into the spotlight

Kevin Garside: It may pass unremarked in theatreland, but homosexuality faces intolerance and hostility throughout society, not just in football

What did ‘The Pass’ reveal about the game and its taboos? Surprisingly little

Treadaway on stage in 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time'

Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time moves to Gielgud Theatre after roof collapse

The play will resume its West End run from 24 June

Arifa Akbar: Let’s ban the latecomers from dramatic readings

"A light appeared deep inside the audience, beaming like a gig-lamp in the hands of a woman below me. It was a Blackberry"

Seventy-nine people were injured after plasterwork fell on to the audience

Heavy rain and years of 'benign neglect' may have caused Apollo Theatre roof collapse

Owner of the playhouse had previously admitted that London’s theatre buildings had 'suffered years of benign neglect'

Proper Champion: The New One, ridden by Sam Twiston-Davies, heads for victory in the International Hurdle

The New One is threat for Champion Hurdle

As fascinating as the emergence of fresh equine talent to watch is the blossoming of one of the human elements of the centaur partnership, and yesterday’s programme at Cheltenham presented both.

Lord Black's large bar bill was the result of a technical glitch

The Feral Beast: Unpaid bar bills, kissing and telling, the great clean-up  trainspotting

Reporters on The Daily Telegraph reeled in a scoop after submitting a Freedom of Information request to the Palace of Westminster, asking who had the biggest unpaid bar bills.

Is HSBC’s fee cuts part of a war or a prelude to charges?

The Feral Beast: Nick Serota's loofah, the luck of Lloyd Webber, Fergie's mistakes, plus Nick Robinson and sex

The groovy revamped Tate Britain opens on Tuesday, and there's an all-day party to celebrate on Saturday, with Hot Chip on the decks. What a different scene would have greeted you only a couple of years ago. One of the biggest changes is the opening of The Grand Saloon, a first-floor room overlooking the Thames. For years it has been divided into offices, one of which was the director Sir Nicholas Serota's private bathroom, complete with tub and loofah. Sadly, I gather the bath has now been thrown out with the bathwater. "I can confirm that Nick has had a bath in there," says a spokesman when I call, "but he moved offices some time ago, and it hadn't been used for a while." Sir Nicholas is chairman of the Turner Prize jury. Surely "Tate director bathing" is an installation we'd all pay to see?

The theatre is going back to its roots with plans for a radical multi-million pound facelift

Bristol Old Vic has facelift to make it look 250 years’ older

Historic theatre will unveil front wall dating from 1766 to rebuild ties with city

Centre stage: Tony Hall plans live broadcasts from the National Theatre

BBC to beef up its arts coverage

Live theatre and series on writers and painters are waiting in the wings – with some familiar old faces

Digging deep: 'The Wasp Factory' at the Linbury Studio

The Wasp Factory: An opera with murder in its heart and a sting in its tale

Iain Banks' cult novel is the unlikely source for a new show at Covent Garden

Neglected historic theatres face demolition

Brighton Hippodrome and Derby Hippodrome among those at risk

Strong-armed: Riot police hold an LGBT activist during a Moscow rally

Gay Russia finds a voice in London play

Playwright compiles victims' accounts in a compelling new drama

Take the plunge: Paul Zivkovich and Kate Jackson in ‘The Drowned Man: A Hollywood Fable’

Why theatre's alternative space invaders need to leave their comfort zone

Plus: Nostalgia at the V&A needs a personal playlist and Rh-app-sody for the iPad

Skater protests force review of Southbank development plans

The Southbank Centre has been forced to review plans for a £120m redevelopment of its site, following a campaign orchestrated by London’s skateboarders to save their “spiritual home”.

Theatre review: Our Town, King's Head Theatre, London

Thornton Wilder won the second of his three Pulitzer Prizes for Our Town in 1938 and the play has been performed somewhere in the United States every night since.

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