Heath Ledger

Cursed genius: Terry Gilliam

Bad luck seems to hover over the visionary film director, but even the death of his leading actor has failed to stop his latest work

Coming to a cinema near you: even bigger audiences

For the hippies at Woodstock, it was the summer of sex and psychedelia but back across the Atlantic, the buttoned-up Brits who eschewed the hedonism of 1969 preferred to call it the summer of cinema.

From tragedy to farce: Heath Ledger's final act

Terry Gilliam managed to complete his latest film, 'The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus', despite the death of its star midway through production. But we may never get to see it. Guy Adams reports

Cultural Life: Laura Marling, Singer

I just started reading a collection of Raymond Carver's short stories, Where I'm Calling From. I've only read two of the stories. "A Small, Good Thing" is very quickly heartbreaking. It is about a woman whose son is hit by a car while she is buying cakes. I am still reading A Good Man in Africa by William Boyd.

My Week In Media: Tracey Cox

Last week I read...

I looked through the Daily Mail most days this week because I get it free at my gym. I've been following its coverage of knife and gun crime with interest. It really concerns me, but actually I was talking to a senior police officer this week who was adamant that the situation wasn't getting any worse – it is just getting more media coverage.

The child star and the painkillers found at Heath Ledger's bedside

The mystery surrounding Heath Ledger's death deepened yesterday, when it emerged that the actress Mary-Kate Olsen is refusing to co-operate with investigators trying to establish how the Dark Knight star got hold of the powerful painkillers that caused his accidental fatal overdose.

The Big Question: How do censors determine the award of certificates

The new Batman movie, besides being wildly popular, may be the most violent and disturbing film to have been passed as a 12A – and that rating has led some people to question the validity of the movie certification system. Concern has been expressed in the Press, and on Newsnight Review on BBC2 last week, critic Paul Morley said that he was "absolutely staggered" that children would be able to attend the film. The controversy is heightened by the fact that under the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC)'s 12A rating, a child of any age accompanied by an adult will be able to see the movie.

More headlines

Batmobile rolls into town for premiere of 'Dark Knight'

Huge crowds, a red carpet snaking the length of Leicester Square and celebrities galore. This, though, was no ordinary film premiere – the first sign of that being the two-ton black Batmobile that crawled slowly through the streets of the West End before pulling up at a Bat-emblazoned Odeon theatre to offload its A-list cast.

The Dark Knight: the legacy of Heath Ledger

The Australian actor's death deprived Hollywood of one of its brightest young stars. But his performance as The Joker in the new Batman film suggests he was saving his best for last. David Usborne reports on an unlikely candidate for success at the Oscars