News People take part in a simulation entitled 'A Day in the Life of a Refugee: Exploring Solutions for Syria'

The most agonising choice many attendees of the World Economic Forum in Davos face is whether to go for a Martini or a smooth Riesling at the countless lavish parties that take place after hours.

British aid driver 'was shot in back of head'

A BRITISH relief worker shot dead in an ambush in Bosnia a week ago was the victim of an 'execution-style killing', an inquest was told yesterday.

Aid worker's 'killers' shot

Bosnian security forces yesterday shot dead three men wanted for the abduction and murder of a British aid worker and the attempted murder of two other Britons, the country's Muslim-led government said, Reuter reports from Sarajevo.

Somalis free UN aid worker

MOGADISHU (Reuter) - Kidnappers freed a British aid worker unharmed in Mogadishu yesterday after 42 hours, and officials said they believed more abductions in Somalia were unlikely.

Confusion over aid convoys

Confusion surrounded the resumption of aid convoys to central Bosnia yesterday, with United Nations military sources saying the first trucks would roll on Wednesday, while UN aid workers said they knew nothing of the move, AFP reports from Sarajevo. The UN Secretary-General, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, suspended convoys to the region four weeks ago after a Danish truck driver was killed in a mortar attack near Novi Travnik, an attack the UN blamed on the Muslim-dominated Bosnian army.

Volunteer shot

(First Edition)

Letter: Uses of bombs in Bosnia

Sir: In these heart-rending days, the immediate and most important criticism of the Bishop of Barking's otherwise laudable pronouncement (leading article, 9 August) is not so much that he was in principle possibly wrong to specify military means, but that he specified the wrong ones.

Letter: Irish aid workers driven by history

IN ANSWER to Richard Dowden's question in his admirable article on the famine in Sudan: 'Why are so many aid workers Irish?' ('Why the food just stopped', Review, 6 June). We like to think that, far from being attracted to death and war, Irish people become aid workers because we have a folk memory of our own famine and consequently have a natural empathy with people who starve while governments stand by.

TELEVISION / Thought for food

THE tenacity of human life can be remarkable. In the 40 Minutes Special (BBC 2) on three young aid workers, we were shown a one- year-old child who weighed only three pounds. His face had a look of baffled surprise and his eyes seemed to spin a little unsteadily, as if even those tiny muscles had run out of energy. Yet when a cup of formula came within reach, he had the strength to reach out and his strange chirping cry, synchronised with his breathing, rose a little in entreaty.
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