Life and Style

The two companies have largely been on the same side in the patent wars

Seve Ballesteros family takes offence at ‘bad taste’ EurAsia Cup tournament

The ghost of Seve Ballesteros is at the heart of a golfing dispute that threatens to turn ugly for the European Tour.

Iron Maiden perform at Ozzfest in 2005

David Cameron appoints Iron Maiden-loving MP Mike Weatherley as music piracy advisor

Mr Weatherley pledged to wear an Iron Maiden T-shirt in the Commons chamber after he was elected in 2010 but was denied by the Speaker

Here's a solution: It's time for a global companies to pay a Global Profit Tax

The cascade of revelations in recent months showing multinational companies doing a huge amount of business here and yet paying virtually no corporation tax has provoked widespread public demands for something to be done. But people tend to be rather hazier on what that "something" should be.

Matt Brittin, Google's vice president for northern and central Europe

HMRC are being 'bamboozled' by Google: MPs confront search giant over 'devious' attempt to avoid paying UK tax

Internet giants on back foot after shopping giant admitted it receives more in government grants than it pays in UK corporate tax

Ben Chu: Let's not get bamboozled by Google in the global tax avoidance debate

Outlook Who says politics is boring? There was another entertaining session of the Public Accounts Committee today as Google's Matt Brittin received a fresh savaging from the chair Margaret Hodge over the internet giant's tax avoidance. The climax came when Ms Hodge told Mr Brittin: "I think you do do evil". The spanking followed revelations about Amazon's minuscule corporation tax bill earlier in the week. How Ms Hodge must have wished she'd been able to give Jeff Bezos a tongue lashing too.

IP and copyright's £3bn boost to Britain

The creative industries contribute an extra £3bn a year to the UK economy thanks to the value of their intellectual property (IP) and copyright.

The real deal? Brands have suffered from a flood of fakes

Stitched up – labels hit back at replica trade

Designers want action taken against market in fake goods

The global file-sharing crackdown

In France, the Hadopi law introduced a “three-strike” procedure leading to suspension of internet access for repeat offenders. More than 700,000 notices have been sent, reaching around 10 per cent of peer-to-peer file-sharers in France.

Yahoo may sue Facebook

Yahoo is threatening to sue Facebook for allegedly infringing more than a dozen patents covering how to personalise websites, serve adverts and run a social network.

Trademark row could lead to iPad shortages

A Chinese firm which claims that it owns the iPad trademark in China is to ask customs officials to block shipments of Apple's iconic device in a move that could potentially disrupt the technology giant's supply chain.

1974: Francis Ford Coppola and Vladimir Nabokov wrote the screenplay after Truman Capote was replaced for the 1974 version. It starred Robert Redford as Gatsby and Mia Farrow as Daisy

Which Gatsby is the greatest? Plays go head-to-head in roaring Twenties row

Three productions clash with the DiCaprio blockbuster – so which will end in tragedy?

Wikipedia in piracy row blackout

Wikipedia blacked out the English language version of its website today in protest at anti-piracy laws being considered by the US government.

An end to bad heir days: The posthumous power of the literary estate

On the last day of 2011, the 70th anniversary year of his death, James Joyce's work finally passed out of copyright. It was the dawn of a new age for Joyce scholars, publishers and biographers who are now free to quote or publish him without the permission of the ferociously prohibitive Joyce estate.

Call for copyright law changes

Changes to intellectual property (IP) systems, including copyright, could add up to £7.9 billion to the UK's economy, according to a review.

UK's copyright laws set for dramatic overhaul

An independent review that could lead to a dramatic overhaul of copyright law in Britain is finally scheduled to be released next week. The Hargreaves Review into the country's intellectual-property framework, launched by the Prime Minister in November, had been due for publication in April but was delayed until after the local elections. However, The Independent has learned that Jeremy Hunt, the Culture Secretary, will tomorrow join the academic Ian Hargreaves, who chaired the inquiry, at a briefing for key industry figures. The review's findings will then be formally made public next week.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

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In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

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‘Can we really just turn away?’

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Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

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Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

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That's a bit rich

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Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

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