Arts and Entertainment Robert Whitehead, Arthur Miller and Elia Kazan working on the production of the play 'After the Fall' in the Chelsea Hotel, 1963

Everything was permitted at the Chelsea, apart from attachment parenting

Review: American Smoke: Journeys to the End of the Light, By Iain Sinclair

Having for more than 50 years travelled mentally in Stateside realms of literary gold, Iain Sinclair trekked round North America in person in 2011 “hoping to reconnect with the heroes of my youth”. These included the Beats Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, and William Burroughs, among other mavericks and rebels whose artistic visions burgeoned, coast to coast, in avant-garde hothouses of the 1950s such as Black Mountain College in North Carolina where the new leading (albeit then underground) lights of Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Ed Dorn, and their ilk were kindled.

A shell-shocked Simon Kerrigan is comforted by England's senior spin bowler Graeme Swann

Kevin Garside on the Ashes: Australia feast on England's new boys as brutal Shane Watson flays Simon Kerrigan

There was no shortage of advice for the lad. Every punter in the gallery, even those in green and gold, would not have wished a repeat of the pre-lunch flogging administered to Simon Kerrigan. Pitch it up, son, bowl to your field and let fate take care of the rest.

Record art prices fuel Christie’s sales boom

A new generation of wealthy Chinese have become big new bidders in the art market and helped to drive worldwide sales at the auction house Christie’s to a record-breaking £2.4bn for the first half of this year.

Benjamin Grosvenor, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Andrew Litton, Barbican Hall, London

How often does it need to be said that a self-laudatory programme-note is a hostage to fortune? As a preamble to her new orchestral work ‘Night Ferry’, Anna Clyne pre-empted what critics might say by providing her own review.

Jackson Pollock’s Summertime, at A Bigger Splash in the Tate Modern

IoS art review: A Bigger Splash, Tate Modern, London

Two painters make a solid start, but what follows is endless sixth-form performance art

Economic crisis, what economic crisis? Sotheby's auction makes a whopping $375 million led by Rothko and Pollock sales

Sotheby's staged the biggest auction in its 268-year history last night, led by a $75 million (£47.1 million) Mark Rothko and a record-setting $40 million (£25.1 million) work by Jackson Pollock at its post-war and contemporary art sale.

Mel Bochner, If The Colour Changes, Whitechapel Gallery, London

A photograph of Matisse working in his studio as an elderly man inspired the young American conceptual artist Mel Bochner to create Theory of Painting (1970). It was not the woman that Matisse was painting on the canvas that caught Bochner’s attention, however, but the newspapers spread under his feet.  

Picture preview: No Jokes Please, We're Italian

Next week Milan-based Stefano Mezzaroma’s first UK exhibition opens at The Italian Cultural Institute in London. No Jokes Please: We’re Italian features works lampooning well-known multinational brands, and will be popular with fans of contemporary pop art.

Cézanne sale breaks world record

A painting by Paul Cézanne of two peasants playing cards has sold for a record price of £158.4 million.

Roderic Fenwick Owen: Writer and adventurer who became court poet to a Sheikh

The death of Roderic Fenwick Owen a month before his 90th birthday marks the belated breaking of many moulds. Descended from an old Lincolnshire family and heir to a handsome fortune, Fenwick Owen spent the late 1940s crewing his way around the world on tramp steamers; these typically belonged to shipping lines owned by the families of schoolfriends from Summer Fields or Eton. The young Englishman jumped ship from the SS Wairuna on a remote Tahitian island, intent on a year of beachcombing. Instead, he was seduced by, and married, a Polynesian princess called Turia, only to desert her a year later and sail on. The story of his youth reads like a novel by Somerset Maugham. Containerisation and mass tourism would make it impossible today.

Album: Earle Brown, Synergy (Hat [now] Art)

Brown, though never as celebrated as his pals Cage and Feldman, produced some of the more enjoyably questing systems music of the last century.

The Hand That First Held Mine, By Maggie O'Farrell

Since her early novels After You'd Gone and My Lover's Lover, Maggie O'Farrell's fiction has been touched by the otherwordly. In this new book - winner of the 2010 Costa Novel Award - she exchanges the more febrile expressions of romantic love for a haunting tale of the baby blues.

Kapitoil, By Teddy Wayne

Reality bytes for a city slicker

Biopic to tell the outrageous story of Peggy Guggenheim

A film featuring racy sex scenes, the sinking of the Titanic and portrayals of Marcel Duchamp, Jackson Pollock and James Joyce might be dismissed as too far-fetched by Hollywood standards.

The Pattern in the Carpet: A Personal History With Jigsaws, By Margaret Drabble Atlantic

It was to ward away "ill thoughts" while her husband had cancer that Margaret Drabble took to doing jigsaws. A self-confessed untidy writer, Drabble finds succour in them, and the escape they offer from the messiness and ragged edges of human life, where broken ties cannot easily be mended, and missing pieces refuse to be filled.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?