Arts and Entertainment

Richard LaGravenese DVD/Blu-ray (124mins)

DVD & Blu-ray: Margin Call (15)

JC Chandor's snappy drama, which bites like Glengarry Glen Ross, centres on Zachary Quinto's entry-level analyst unearthing a potentially ruinous high-risk project for his wealthy Manhattan firm.

'Ow 'Liza and the BBC Proms is doing 'My Fair Lady'?

Eliza Doolittle will screech in Cockney and sing posh as the quintessential London musical "My Fair Lady", a product of the Broadway stage, makes its BBC Proms debut on Saturday in a lavish production that owes a debt to Hollywood.

Television Choices: Working a way out of a pensions predicament

The Town That Never Retired

Foy says: 'I like directors who make you work hard'

A class act: Claire Foy on criticism, tumours and embarrassing sex scenes

Her luminous good looks made her the star of Little Dorrit and Upstairs Downstairs. As she prepares to light up our TV screens once again, Claire Foy talks to Gerard Gilbert.

Editor-At-Large: A class imprisoned by tribalism, lack of work and filthy food

How do we stop the riots happening again? I agree with Iain Duncan Smith that locking young people up is no solution and exposes them to career criminals. Fining guilty kids and removing benefits is pretty pointless: how are they supposed to save up and pay for their mistakes? Since the rioting, there have been over 1,800 arrests, two-thirds of which are of kids aged between 11 and 24 – the vast majority young men who are unemployed and unemployable.

Josephine Hart: Novelist best known for ‘Damage’ who was also a producer, presenter and a passionate advocate for poetry

"Damaged people are dangerous. They know they can survive." Josephine Hart is best known for her début novel Damage, which she wrote in six weeks and which was translated into 23 languages and sold one million copies around the world. It was alsomade into a successful film, directed by Louis Malle, scripted by David Hare and starring Jeremy Irons, Miranda Richardson, Juliette Binoche and Rupert Graves.

Dominic Lawson: Spare me lectures from deluded actors

Jeremy Irons is a very suitable standard-bearer for eternal misanthropes: his particular talent on film is to exude moroseness from every pore

How TV drama became university challenged

When TV drama focuses on higher education, the results are excellent. Why, then, has it so often ignored academia? Gerard Gilbert reports

Smoothies and ice maidens - the literary figures that enthral us all

Asked to choose the smoothest heroes and iciest heroines in literature, John Sutherland found a mixture of fascination and fear.

Edward Seckerson: Six of the Worst

The word on the street is that "Too Close to the Sun" - a new musical by the composer who tormented us with "The Man in the Iron Mask" - has no business in the West End. How did it get there? Someone's hard-earned money unknowingly squandered. And all the while a wealth of writing talent goes unnoticed and unheard. Don't get me started.

First Impressions: Brideshead Revisited, Granada (1981)

It must, I feel sure, have been Evelyn Waugh who said you should always think of those less fortunate than yourself. How much more entertaining for most of us to think of those more fortunate than ourselves getting it in the neck. Brideshead Revisited seems likely to be an abiding delight, not just because the noble house of Marchmain get what is coming to them, but because it is a book of great splendour, splendidly done. I am particularly grateful to John Mortimer, who adapted the book, for his remarkable fidelity to Waugh. I noticed only one ripple of Rumpole. "There is no Mrs Lunt," said Mr Lunt, with notable satisfaction.

Past Imperfect, By Julian Fellowes

If you miss the rituals of the class system, read on

24-Hour Room Service: Casanova Hotel, Barcelona, Spain

Arriving at the Casanova felt like walking on to a film set. This wasn't without grounds, because we were (if only for the day). A TV crew filming a beer advert had set up in the hotel's bar, which meant that cameras, bright lights, swarthy men and beer bottles were strewn all over the place – not that any of this fazed the immaculately groomed staff, who carried on as if it were just another working day.

Casanova, By Ian Kelly

Casanova was a generous and charming man who found true love – over and over again
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Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

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