Arts and Entertainment

"I must go to bed now as we have an early start in the morning," wrote 12-year-old Joyce Henderson in her diary on 31 Aug 1939. "Tomorrow, I become an evacuee and it's all because of something called war."

Katie Hopkins has posted a less-than-kind Tweet about Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson

Katie Hopkins Tweets joke about Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson

The This Morning regular does what she does best - cause offence

BBC One's Andrew Marr will return to full-time television in September

Broadcaster has already conducted a political interview which will be broadcast on Sunday 

Eric Pickles' tweeted an image of himself eating salad, parodying George Osborne's burger picture

Pickles and Salad? Eric Pickles hits back at Osborne with picture of himself eating a SALAD

Mr Pickles was on the receiving end of a Osborne jibe during the Spending Review speech when the chancellor dubbed him a 'model of lean government'

The inquiry into Shuart Hall's (pictured) crimes will be separate from the one into Jimmy Savile's

BBC launches 'freestanding investigation' into behaviour of disgraced ex-star Stuart Hall

The inquiry will be separate from Dame Janet Smith's investigation into Jimmy Savile's crimes

Harriet Harman in call to tackle ageism

Harriet Harman has written to major broadcasters asking about the number of older women employed within their organisations, the Labour Party said today.

John King, America's answer to Gary Neville

Best US election TV wizardry: CNN gives good graphics

The Beeb may have had the gravitas of the Dimblebot, Sky News may have had the resources of News International and ITV may have had slightly squiffy Ian Hislop at the US embassy party, but for sheer number-crunching brilliance, yesterday morning's winner was CNN.

RBS, which saw its shares drop more than 3 per cent, also came under pressure after a report in the Financial Times suggested it could require a further bailout from the Government

David Cameron could block £500m RBS bonus

Prime Minister David Cameron warned today that the Government could stop a proposed £500 million bonus payout for investment bankers at the largely state-owned RBS.

The Week in Radio: When the voice of the people carries lots of weight

If the riots were about divisions in society coming to the fore, then radio phone-ins are similar, without the window-breaking and the plasma screens. Take the explosive mix of tensions, prejudice and bigotry that kicked off on Jeremy Vine's phone-in on fat people.

The Week In Radio: Odd couple make the chattering classes chuckle

Have you ever said to yourself, "Why is there never enough BBC drama about middle-class people with young children living in north London?" No? Me neither. I know Outnumbered was very successful on TV, but sometimes feels like the whole of north London is squabbling, parenting and getting a divorce right here in my (south London) kitchen.

Mary Dejevsky: If you want the benefits of marriage, take the plunge

If two people decide not to register their relationship, or if they just don't get round to it, what duty should the law have to them?

The Week In Radio: New voice gives early risers reasons to be cheerful

What do you want at five o'clock in the morning? Ideally deep slumber between silken sheets, of course, but if you have to be awake, is Vanessa Feltz the answer? For most radio networks, getting-up time is the most intimate part of the day, the time when listeners are at their most irascible. Annoy them at your peril. Sarah Kennedy, who departed the Radio 2 early morning show abruptly last year, had, to say the least, a distinctive style. She was Bunty Bagshaw, listeners were the Dawn Patrollers. There was cosy giggling and in-jokes. How will three million listeners take to Vanessa, a crisp, no-nonsense Cambridge First? And how will Feltz cope with a 3.30am start, as well as hosting her daily Radio London show, a new Channel 5 show, and deputising for Jeremy Vine?

'Unmarried, disloyal and cold': Miliband feels listeners' wrath

Ed Miliband admitted yesterday that he had to improve the way he got his message across to voters as he pleaded for more time during an uncomfortable radio phone-in.

Katy Guest: Rant & Rave (28/11/10)

Rant

The Week In Radio: It's great that Feltz has answered the call from Radio 2

It's a fine art, presenting a phone-in. Like politicians, presenters face the daunting occupational hazard of having actual contact with the public, however chatty, deranged or boring they may be. It was Peter Cook who first realised that you could call in and say just about anything you liked, live on air, as long as you weren't obviously obscene. He spent many happy evenings between 1988 and 1992 calling Clive Bull's late-night LBC phone-in, posing as Sven from Swiss Cottage, a bipolar Norwegian fisherman engaged in a fruitless search for his estranged wife and talking about fish. You can still hear some of these meanderings on YouTube. "You sound a bit depressed," says Clive, unnecessarily.

Clegg 'massively regrets' tuition fees increase

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg today said he "massively regrets" being unable to deliver on his pledge to prevent university tuition fee increases.

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NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own