Travel Another country: The real or theoretical remoteness of places such as St Mawes are part of the Cornish identity

One of the fascinating truths about second homes is that owners always lie about how long it takes to reach them. This is obviously a defence mechanism to protect against criticism or self-doubt.

Why Britain definitely needs a liquorice museum

Pontefract aims to celebrate its most famous export, and lure liquorice-loving tourists to come and part with their pennies

Amritsar: Why, when it comes to crimes of empire, ‘sorry’ often comes with a price tag

The Prime Minister stopped short of issuing a full apology on his visit to India

The winning team from University of Birmingham l-r: Jonathan Jones, Richard Tasker, Harry Proud and Harry Thorpe

The iQuiz final: '50% More Moustache' victorious by a whisker

On Tuesday night, 18 crack teams of students convened at Birmingham's Ikon Gallery for the inaugural iQuiz. Each team had battled through regional heats in November, lured by an unforgettable prize: a two-week trek across America.

Christopher Ironside examines one of his designs in 1968

The true story of how my dad made the mint

He designed the first decimal coin, and now Virginia Ironside’s father is getting one of his own

Your banking reforms do not go far enough, Osborne told

Commissioner appointed to recommend changes criticises Chancellor's conclusions

Invisible Ink: No 126 - James Hadley Chase

Writers suffer different levels of public amnesia. James Hadley Chase's name still sounds familiar to many who have forgotten his books, and there's a reason for that: the name became synonymous with a certain kind of disreputable crime novel. Yet he was born in the Edwardian era. Why, then, do we associate him with something too racy to be kept on the family bookshelves?

Stepping back in time: Rules is a phenomenon because of its history

Rules, 35 Maiden Lane Covent Garden, London WC2

I hadn't been to Rules since the mid-1980s and all I remembered of the place was a heavy atmosphere of dark wood, hefty carpets, thick sauces and sturdy-bottomed English lunchers. Heaviness was my main impression; but then history, of a dense, richly-flavoured kind, hangs around Rules like mayoral chains. It's England's oldest restaurant, founded by Thomas Rule in 1798. It's been owned by only three families in 200 years. It's seen off nine English monarchs. It turns up in several novels: the adulterous couple in Graham Greene's The End of the Affair enjoyed their first lurve tryst here over a furtive dish of seductive onions.

A-Z Of Employers: ICI

Cor, blimey! Luton is voted the 'crappiest' town in Britain

The place immortalised by Lorraine 'Luton Airport' Chase is brought down to earth with a snub

Beware patriots and purple prophylactics

As the late Sir John Betjeman might have written:

Jennifer Ross

Aide to Alan Ross on the 'London Magazine'
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
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Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
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10 best PS4 games

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Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent