Arts and Entertainment Daniel Radcliffe and Dane DeHaan in 'Kill Your Darlings'

Beyond the Hogwarts-style specs which he wears, Ginsberg has nothing in common with Harry Potter

'Ow 'Liza and the BBC Proms is doing 'My Fair Lady'?

Eliza Doolittle will screech in Cockney and sing posh as the quintessential London musical "My Fair Lady", a product of the Broadway stage, makes its BBC Proms debut on Saturday in a lavish production that owes a debt to Hollywood.

The Cherry Orchard, National Theatre: Olivier, London

Despair and laughter in equal doses

Shine agrees to News Corp takeover

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation has unveiled a £415 million deal to buy the TV production company set up by his daughter.

The night Gielgud's career lay in ruins – and his cry for help was ignored

New biography claims West End producer could have suppressed story of actor's arrest

Julius Caesar, Roundhouse, London

Friends, Romans, and thugs

My Hamlet, Assembly Rooms, Edinburgh

"Who's there?" cries Hamlet on the battlements of Elsinore, kick-starting the greatest revenge tragedy in the language. "Who's there?" cries Linda Marlowe as an old cleaning lady, sweeping up back stage.

James Lees-Milne: The Life, By Michael Bloch

A detailed, chatty biography of an author who wrote detailed, chatty diaries may seem superfluous, but, as with Pepys, a fuller picture emerges.

Forgotten authors No. 55: Hugh Wheeler

Some writers are forgotten because they are chameleons. Tracking their work becomes a slippery business. They change names, switch genres and leave behind their work scattered through library systems and traceable only by ISBN number. In the history of this column, one name has remained on my list from the outset. Hugh Callingham Wheeler was also known as Patrick Quentin, Jonathan Stagge and Q Patrick, and facts about him are hopelessly few, perhaps because he remained single and lived privately.

A Tug on the Thread: From the British Raj to the British Stage, by Diana Quick

Raven-haired, stop-you-in-your-stride-eyed Diana Quick is just the kind of memoirist who would have readers flicking to the index for a pagination of juicy bits.

Fire dash as Blairs' toast goes up in smoke

Three fire engines raced to Tony and Cherie Blair's home in Buckinghamshire after smoke was seen billowing from the £6m property. The cause of the alarm: four incinerated slices of toast.

Opening Doors And Windows, By James Roose-Evans

The theatre world is littered with self-styled gurus and shamans, but it is rare to find a director who is also an Anglican priest. In this charming and insightful memoir, 82-year-old James Roose-Evans takes us on a spiritual and creative journey from his literally tortured adolescence (he was prone to self-flagellation) to the twin heights of ordination in Hereford cathedral and Broadway success.

How TV drama became university challenged

When TV drama focuses on higher education, the results are excellent. Why, then, has it so often ignored academia? Gerard Gilbert reports

Julius Caesar, Courtyard, Stratford-upon-Avon

Like Hermia in The Dream, I am amazed and know not what to say: the seething mob takes a bow at the end of the new RSC Julius Caesar – but they are on film. The video empire strikes back, assuming a reality of relationship with a theatre audience that cannot possibly exist. Or can it?

First Impressions: Brideshead Revisited, Granada (1981)

It must, I feel sure, have been Evelyn Waugh who said you should always think of those less fortunate than yourself. How much more entertaining for most of us to think of those more fortunate than ourselves getting it in the neck. Brideshead Revisited seems likely to be an abiding delight, not just because the noble house of Marchmain get what is coming to them, but because it is a book of great splendour, splendidly done. I am particularly grateful to John Mortimer, who adapted the book, for his remarkable fidelity to Waugh. I noticed only one ripple of Rumpole. "There is no Mrs Lunt," said Mr Lunt, with notable satisfaction.

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Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
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Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
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The model for a gadget launch

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She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

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A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
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Europe's biggest steampunk convention

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