Voices
Even with the reforms, public-sector pensions are better than private sector equivalents

'Revolving door' leads ex-health chief into job with lobbying firm

England's former chief medical officer has joined a global lobbying firm advising companies in the private health industry.

Steve Richards: An issue that can no longer be avoided

The bankers still collect their mind-boggling bonuses while relatively low-paid workers take a pay cut

Leading article: Genuine fairness means reform from top to bottom

Is there no longer such a thing as public sector ethos; if not, might it not be time to bring it back?

Leading article: Reform on the cheap will not work

The Coalition's great welfare reform effort is taking shape. The Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, announced at the weekend that a "universal credit" will replace the existing cat's cradle of different sources of financial support available to those in need.

John Rentoul: Collaborators, your country needs you

If the voters are to be persuaded by Labour’s case, the best way to do that is to help the Government achieve the social-democratic aims that it pretends to espouse

Leading article: The pluses – and minuses – of the big tent

Alan Milburn's decision to accept an invitation to work for the coalition brings to three the number of prominent former Labour figures who have, in a sense, crossed the floor. He follows Frank Field and John Hutton in agreeing to place his expertise at the service of the Government. And there could be a fourth if it turns out that David Blunkett is also in line for a role. Mr Milburn, who produced a report on social mobility for the last government, will advise on improving the chances of the least well off; he will not be paid.

A collaborator whose conscience is perfectly clear

Labour MP Frank Field tells Andy McSmith how he incurred the wrath of his own party by becoming the coalition's 'poverty tsar'

John Rentoul: Labour must leave a door ajar for Clegg

Cameron wants to absorb the Lib Dem leader, who is not for being absorbed. By 2015, it may be Miliband agreeing with Nick

BBC blames £2bn black hole as it slashes pension scheme benefits

The BBC yesterday became one of the first quasi-public sector bodies to take the axe to its final salary pension scheme, blaming a £2bn funding black hole. The final salary scheme will be closed to new staff from this December while existing staff will see their benefits sharply reduced.

Row as Labour minister joins 'pension cuts' body

John Hutton, a former Labour Cabinet minister, has been appointed to head a commission that will look for ways to cut the cost of pensions for public sector workers.

Robert Verkaik: How fitting – another attempt to make this issue disappear

Jack Straw is used to fending off awkward questions about Britain's role in the alleged rendition and torture of terror suspects.

Pilot's father fights to clear his boy's name

The MoD accused Jonathan Tapper of gross negligence when his Chinook helicopter crashed in 1994

Hutton admits saying Brown would be disaster as PM

It was one of the worst-kept secrets in Westminster: which cabinet minister said Gordon Brown would be a "fucking disaster" as prime minister before he had even stepped into 10 Downing Street?

Parliament 'misled over rendition of alleged terrorists'

The Government misled Parliament over two alleged terrorists who were subject to 'extraordinary rendition', a legal charity said today.

MoD 'did not want to breach privacy of detainee'

The Government misled MPs over Britain’s role in the rendition of two men arrested by the UK and then imprisoned by the Americans for five years in Afghanistan, it is claimed today.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

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Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?