Voices

Smoking is the hazy fug of a 1930s jazz club, the deadline mist of a 1970s newsroom and the chocolate-wood smell of my granddad’s lounge circa 1988

My Fantasy Band: Jools Holland

Lead vocals - Bessie Smith & Solomon Burke

I could listen to Bessie Smith all day. Solomon Burke sadly died last month but I toured with him; he was amazing. His vocals inspired people like Van Morrison and Otis Redding.

Album: Jools Holland & His R&B Orchestra, Rockinghorse (Rhino)

Newsflash: He hasn't gone dubstep.

Diary: Unproductive behaviour

Mark Ronson has developed an unfortunate habit of putting his foot in it (you'd almost think he had a new album to promote). First, there was his comment, in an interview with Esquire, that he regretted dating a certain 'It' girl: "I look back on it," he lamented, "and think, 'God, did I really just step into the cliché like that?'" Said cliché was, gossips presumed, his relationship with model Daisy Lowe, whom he ran into at the GQ Men of the Year awards, to which she was accompanied by her new boyfriend, Doctor Who. Then, on Friday night, Ronson told Jools Holland that as a producer, he had taken Amy Winehouse's demos and from them "created" the hits on her album Back to Black. "[R]onson you're dead to me", Winehouse tweeted in response, "one album I write an [sic] you take half the credit – make a career out of it? don't think so BRUV". The lingo is authentic, though Ms Winehouse's account remains unverified by Twitter HQ (so may not, in fact, really be hers). It's also possible she was joking.

Al Green/Michael McDonald, O2 Arena, London

Reviewed by Ian McCann

Dylan Jones: 'I became obsessed with ‘Wichita Lineman’ – I even wrote about the song for this newspaper'

For years I thought I was the only person who liked Glen Campbell's "Wichita Lineman" (Capitol Records, 1968); in truth I thought I was the only person who had heard of it. The song was as much a part of my childhood as the other records my parents filled the house with, and along with Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Matt Monroe, Nina and Frederick and John Barry (whose "Vendetta" was my co-favourite song as a boy), the work of Campbell saturated my life.

Paloma Faith: From burlesque performer to music's Next Big Thing

There's been an incident. Thanks to the internet, I've heard all about it before we even meet. Shortly before she sets out from her rented flat in Islington to the private members' club in central London where we are destined to share afternoon tea, Paloma Faith broadcasts the breaking news on Twitter: "ho hum! i didnt get nominated for a brit award but nor did amy [Winehouse] on her first album so i will try not to get upset". But she is upset, and by the time she arrives at our chosen destination, she is very upset indeed.

Black Joe Lewis and The Honeybears, The Garage, London

This is Friday night," Black Joe Lewis reminds the crowd as they happily howl for more. "Don't y'all got nothing better to do?" Not now, they don't.

Pandora: Should Davis forget about his dream job?

David Cameron may have announced plans to promote his former leader Iain Duncan Smith, but there remain no such assurances for the party's long-serving henchman David Davis.

Alela Diane, Shepherds Bush Empire, London

In the true tradition of folk, singer-songwriter Alela Diane's shows are a family affair. Her father Tom Menig plays guitar and mandolin, while her boyfriend is the bassist.

My Week: Stewart Copeland

When he wasn't promoting his new book, The Police's former drummer was composing the score for and narrating 'Ben Hur Live' in London

Simon Dee: Broadcaster who made his name on pirate radio and epitomised the Swinging Sixties

With his lanky frame, blond fringe, cheeky smile and floral shirts and ties, Simon Dee was among the most recognisable faces of the Swinging Sixties. His combination of lighthearted banter and music was a winning combination for both his radio programmes and his television series, Dee Time. However his fall from grace, which was largely of his own making, was spectacular and he never regained his popularity.

Guitar hero – the radio tour

Joan Armatrading has picked her five favourite players for a Radio 4 series. They'd make rather odd supergroup, she tells John Walsh

On Roads, By Joe Moran

Everyone can get their kicks on the A36
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?