Voices

Smoking is the hazy fug of a 1930s jazz club, the deadline mist of a 1970s newsroom and the chocolate-wood smell of my granddad’s lounge circa 1988

Tonight's theme: Jools and the caterpillar

Phil Johnson checks in for some olde English rhythm 'n' blues

Food: Cool for fat cats

It may not be Frank's Cafe in Greenwich, but Jools Holland finds that Claridge's still offers value at pounds 340 for four. Photographs by Morle y von Sternberg

Television Review: Body Story

I'M A FAN of Body Story (C4); I love it with a passion. The only thing on television which makes me laugh more is Frasier. Body Story, however, is a documentary. Over the past few weeks this overly imaginative docu-drama hybrid has been breezing through life's stages, fleshing out development's bare bones with vivid animatronics and a bad script. Last night it followed a woman called Marion during pregnancy.

Television Reviews: Beat Route and Body Story

"WHY DO SOVIET leaders only drink herbal tea? Because proper tea is theft," said Jools Holland in a sculpture park filled with redundant Soviet statuary on the outskirts of Budapest in Beat Route (BBC2) last night. Which brought to mind another thought: What's worse than Jools Holland? Jools Holland telling jokes as faded in the memory as the Evil Empire itself. Or, as the split-screen opening sequence made clear, what's worse than Jools Holland? Two Jools Hollands.

Middlebrow home of the grooviest tunes around

It's all change at Radio 2. A clutch of star signings are threatening to make it hip. Vanessa Thorpe tunes in

Times-a-changing for Radio 2

SHOOTING STARS frontman Mark Lamarr and former Squeeze star Jools Holland have been signed up as presenters by BBC Radio 2 in an attempt by the station establish a trendier image and capture the "fortysomething" market.

Arts: String something simple

Say goodbye to the stuffy string quartet. Now they're the preserve of trendy twentysomethings.

Pop music: The calm shall inherit the earth

Skye Edwards sings with Morcheeba, the dreamy, gentle trippy-hippy band. She's just made a single, an album - and a baby.

Music: It ain't bossa nova, and don't call me jazz

Egberto Gismonti tells Phil Johnson his musical tales of Brazil

Pop Preview: Sounds like teen spirit

Ben Folds Five

Food stuff; Fertilisers be damned

The fact that one of London's leading distributors of organic fruit and veg is following the supermarket's lead and launching a bonus scheme for customers is an indication that the world of organic produce is certainly no longer the preserve of the knit-your-own-nappy brigade.

Lone star

The Judds could have gone on forever. But illness forced Ma Judd to abandon the Nashville singing duo and leave her daughter Wynonna to go it alone. Interview by Jasper Rees

THE EYE: Television

THANK YOU FOR THE MUSIC

LEST WE FORGET SAM BROWN

With parents like 1960s popsters Joe and Vicki Brown, there was always a good chance that Sam Brown would find the music biz too enticing to resist. And so, after years of backing work with acts as varied as The Small Faces and Spandau Ballet, as well as becoming a Womble, she released a best-selling album whose title track, "Stop", topped the charts around the world. That was a decade ago and, though a successful follow- up appeared shortly afterwards, she grew disenchanted with certain aspects of the industry. She released a tribute album to her mother, who died from cancer in 1991, on her own label before retiring to Scotland to raise a family. But she could not stay away. Lured back as a featured singer with Pink Floyd, she went on to work with Jools Holland and Fish (from Marillion). Now, independent label Demon is about to release a new album, Box, which shows off her powerful vocal talents to the full - particularly on the title track and the arresting "I Forgive You", the new single co-written with Maria McKee.

Riffs: Jools Holland on Willie Dixon's `Wang Dang Doodle'

Some people think it's easy to play the blues. They think that because it's only got three chords anyone can do it. Well, "Wang Dang Doodle" has only got one chord and one repeated riff which really sorts out the men from the boys, the ladies from the girls - because to play it you've really got to know your stuff. You've got to approach the blues with humility. It doesn't matter whether you're black or white - what counts is how you address the music as a musician. You've got to be a listening player if you want to play the blues. We do a version of "Wang Dang Doodle" on the new album in the style of Charles Mingus, with filthy trumpets, like striptease music, dark and jazzy.
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