Voices

Smoking is the hazy fug of a 1930s jazz club, the deadline mist of a 1970s newsroom and the chocolate-wood smell of my granddad’s lounge circa 1988

Festival's God is game for a laugh

Edinburgh row: Church figures angered as satirists find new source of humour in Christian beliefs

Blood, gore and Bible in 90 minutes at Fringe

More than 9,000 people, 14,060 performances, 1,238 shows, 187 venues. . . all that in three weeks. Plans to celebrate the half-century of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. the more unpredictable sister of the International Festival of the arts, were announced yesterday.

Jools Holland gets into the jazz groove

No 129: JAZZ GREATS

Festival Britain

Some time, some place, there's a festival for you this summer, be it firework concerts in the grounds of Warwick Castle or acrobatic massage in Kensington. Your guide: Suzanna Drew-Edwards

feelgood factor: Jools Holland

Reading obituaries is my main health tip. I read them every day. First, I know I must be quite healthy if I'm not included and, second, I try to glean information from the lifestyles of those being written about. When there is a write-up of someone in their seventies or eighties, I often find they have been a painter or a conductor. Both professions require having the arms in the air quite a bit, so I like to keep my arms in the air as much as possible.

The Jools in BBC2's crown

Jools Holland's had a bit of a rough time lately. A monstrously green-eyed hack berated him for being a successful mediocrity, a British stereotype in the vein of Eddie the Eagle. Well, that's hardly fair. Jools is no Art Tatum, but as far as that boogie-woogie stuff goes, he's played with the best.

BOOKS The Hay Festival '95

`Hay on Wye - is that some kind of a sandwich?' Arthur Miller said; here are more tributes to the annual 10-day festival of literature and the arts, and a round-up of events from 26 May to 4 June follow

Clown prince of cool

Wacky musician, 1990s Peter Pan - whoever he really is, Jools Holland is a pixie who likes to have fun

Ready, steady, ramble

The presenter wears cords; the camera stays still; the programme starts at 10pm. Martin Kelner on The White Room, Channel 4's mould-breaking pop show

Start the lift, I want to get out

"It was kind of like free-fall television," said Jools Holland, recalling the glory days of The Tube (in The Legend of the Tube, Channel 4). "It wasn't contrived, was it," he added, turning to Paula Yates for confirmation. "It was genuinely shodd y." It was too, but memory is forgiving and The Tube now stands as one of television's Dunkirks, a disaster proudly remembered because of its evidence of pluck in the face of adversity. They filmed some fine bands too, which is important now that televis ion networks are beginning to exploit the value of their backlists.

Tube-tastic! But still Tops?

As the legend of The Tube is celebrated with a documentary and a 14-wee k series of reruns, Steven Poole questions whether all this retro-TV is really necessary amid today's music shows

Empire brings comedy to Willesden

A new comedy venue is to open next month on the site of a former cinema and variety hall in north-west London.

Edinburgh Festival / Day 4: Having a grand old time of it: At his masterclass, Jools Holland takes things in his stride. Not to mention his boogie woogie

It's a little-known fact about Jools Holland that he comes from a musical dynasty. There was his grandmother, who had an old player-piano in her front-room (a wedding present from her mother). There was his uncle - Uncle David, actually - who played the bass in an R & B band but had mastered the St Louis Blues on the keyboards. And there was his Aunt Eileen who, frankly, taught him all he knows. 'She played the stride piano with that oompah, oompah, oompah rhythm, only she'd keep her left hand in the same place all the time. And she'd leave the sustaining pedal on all the time, so that it sounded like this . . . ' Jools Holland, on stage at the Assembly Rooms, clanked up and down the gleaming black Bosendorfer grand to stunned silence. 'She was,' he continued proudly, 'probably the worst pianist in the world.'

The Edinburgh Festival 1994: Rock

Ryuichi Sakamoto (Playhouse, 031-557 2590, 30 Aug). The Merry Christmas, Mr Lawrence man comes to town.

The pride and joy of Greenwich: Head south of the river this weekend

'Greenwich has its own sense of humour - a cynical, knowing sense of humour.' After seeing lifelong Greenwich resident Malcolm Hardee's act, The Greatest Show On Legs, you may wonder whether 'knowing' is quite the right word. Although hardly the highlight of the Greenwich Festival which opens today, Hardee's legendary strip balloon dance at his own Up the Creek comedy club ('Jongleurs without the A-levels') reflects the organisers' desire for the festival to retain a strong local identity.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before