Laurence Olivier

New home fits the bill for one of the most important private theatre

One of the most important private theatre collections in the world, that of the actors and historians Raymond Mander and Joe Mitchenson, has at last found an ideal home at Bristol University, where it will be preserved as an educational and research facility within the university's theatre library.

The Belfast Festival at Queen's 2010

Now in its 48th year, the Ulster Bank Belfast Festival at Queen’s once again brings an extraordinary programme of cultural delight, to excite inspiration and provoke thought.

Onassis, Novello Theatre, London

Did Aristotle Onassis really conspire in the assassination of Bobby Kennedy in 1968? And did he do so out of cultural envy, sexual jealousy, business tactics, in deference to the PLO (with whom he safeguarded his commercial airline), or mere spite?

David Lister: Redgrave was versatile, vivacious and under-rated

The line from Hamlet that "when sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions" must be haunting the Redgrave family. Vanessa Redgrave, who has lost her daughter and her brother, has had to face within a year the loss of her daughter, brother and now sister.

The Diary: Ian McEwan; Home from War; The Harder They Come; John

The Booker Prize-winning novelist and sometime screenwriter, Ian McEwan, tells me he spent six months meticulously researching and writing a sequel to David Cronenberg film, 'The Fly', in 1995, which he considered his "best screenplay". 'Flies', (not to be mistaken with 1989's 'The Fly II') was to star Geena Davis, who featured opposite Jeff Goldblum in 'The Fly', and who owned the "fly concept" along with 20th Century Fox. McEwan says: "Our movie was going to begin with Geena Davis giving birth to twin boys, and it was written in a realistic mode. She fears her children will be deformed but she gives birth to two perfectly healthy babies. As they become teenagers, they become stranger and stranger, as teenagers do, and quite hyperactive. She has always worried that they inherited the (fly) gene. They become more manic, and one first becomes more fly like, then the other follows....It was my best screenplay... I really wanted this to have no foundation in anything other than genetics." There was a disagreement, leading the project to halt, he added. "I would like to see it made," he said.

Cultural Life: David Parfitt, producer

As chairman of Bafta, all my spare time is spent catching up with the past year's releases. In the last few weeks I've watched: 'The Road', 'Brothers', 'The Blind Side', 'Coraline', 'Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll', 'The Men Who Stare at Goats', 'Fish Tank', 'Sherlock Holmes' and 'It's Complicated'.

Lumley to appear in the West End

In recent years Joanna Lumley has been more often found in the corridors of Westminster than on the boards of the West End. However, this summer she will return to the London stage for the first time in 15 years to star in a revival of the historical comedy, La Bête.

More headlines

Putting the world to rights: Trevor Griffiths on Olivier's

Olivier begged him for a role, Jonathan Pryce owes him his career, and his harrowing play about the NHS received near-record public response. So why has it taken 20 years for Trevor Griffiths' masterpiece about the great reformer Thomas Paine to finally make it to the stage?

Modern miss: Hattie Morahan is ditching bonnets in favour of

When Hattie Morahan played the dowdy, sensible Elinor Dashwood in Andrew Davies' adaptation of Sense and Sensibility, the television critics lavished her with fulsome praise worthy of a love letter penned by Mr Ferrars himself. Her "winningly unshowy performance" was described as both "luminous" and "exceptional". "As good a piece of acting as you're going to see this year" declared one review – a particularly bold claim given that it had screened on 1 January. Even Davies, who had apparently objected to her casting, declared that he had "fallen in love with her performance".