Laurence Olivier

World record holder Makau leads Kenyan Marathon men

Against the breathtaking backdrop of the Great Rift Valley, with hawks circling above, Dave Bedford, the joint race director of the Virgin London Marathon, yesterday unveiled the six Kenyans who will feature in the elite men's field on 23 April.

The Belfast Festival at Queen's 2010

Now in its 48th year, the Ulster Bank Belfast Festival at Queen’s once again brings an extraordinary programme of cultural delight, to excite inspiration and provoke thought.

No frills, no fuss: the first couple of film tie the knot in private

The last time Penelope Cruz wore white for a big occasion was at the 2009 Oscars, when she dedicated her Best Supporting Actress gong to the "actors of my country" but pointedly neglected, in her long list of highly emotional thank-yous, to name-check fellow Spaniard Javier Bardem – not just her co-star in Vicky Cristina Barcelona, but also her boyfriend.

David Lister: Redgrave was versatile, vivacious and under-rated

The line from Hamlet that "when sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions" must be haunting the Redgrave family. Vanessa Redgrave, who has lost her daughter and her brother, has had to face within a year the loss of her daughter, brother and now sister.

The Diary: Ian McEwan; Home from War; The Harder They Come; John

The Booker Prize-winning novelist and sometime screenwriter, Ian McEwan, tells me he spent six months meticulously researching and writing a sequel to David Cronenberg film, 'The Fly', in 1995, which he considered his "best screenplay". 'Flies', (not to be mistaken with 1989's 'The Fly II') was to star Geena Davis, who featured opposite Jeff Goldblum in 'The Fly', and who owned the "fly concept" along with 20th Century Fox. McEwan says: "Our movie was going to begin with Geena Davis giving birth to twin boys, and it was written in a realistic mode. She fears her children will be deformed but she gives birth to two perfectly healthy babies. As they become teenagers, they become stranger and stranger, as teenagers do, and quite hyperactive. She has always worried that they inherited the (fly) gene. They become more manic, and one first becomes more fly like, then the other follows....It was my best screenplay... I really wanted this to have no foundation in anything other than genetics." There was a disagreement, leading the project to halt, he added. "I would like to see it made," he said.

Cultural Life: David Parfitt, producer

As chairman of Bafta, all my spare time is spent catching up with the past year's releases. In the last few weeks I've watched: 'The Road', 'Brothers', 'The Blind Side', 'Coraline', 'Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll', 'The Men Who Stare at Goats', 'Fish Tank', 'Sherlock Holmes' and 'It's Complicated'.

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Jean Simmons: Actress who dazzled opposite the likes of Marlon Brando,

Jean Simmons was one of the great beauties of British cinema, and she had a talent to match. She played Ophelia to Laurence Olivier's Hamlet (1948) when only 18, and won her first Oscar nomination. Audiences were captivated by Simmons from the moment she first appeared on the screen, climbing on to a dance band stand to sing a spirited "Let Him Go, Let Him Tarry" in the popular movie about the RAF in wartime, The Way to the Stars (1945), and she was to swiftly become one of the UK's strongest box-office draws.

Putting the world to rights: Trevor Griffiths on Olivier's

Olivier begged him for a role, Jonathan Pryce owes him his career, and his harrowing play about the NHS received near-record public response. So why has it taken 20 years for Trevor Griffiths' masterpiece about the great reformer Thomas Paine to finally make it to the stage?