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Adventures in the Orgasmatron: Wilhelm Reich and the Invention of Sex,

Slice them where you will, any collection of psychoanalysts is as mad as a parliament. Novelty beards, whirling eyes, twitches, deranged clothing, tics, jitters and habits you wouldn't want to go into. But Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957) was the maddest of the lot. His mainspring theory was that all human ills stemmed from not enough orgasms, and, in particular, not enough proper orgasms, which he plotted on graphs from foreplay to the molten afterglow of WH Auden's "Lullaby" (1940): "Soul and body have no bounds:/ To lovers as they lie upon/ Her tolerant enchanted slope/ In their ordinary swoon."

The Kreutzer Sonata, Gate Theatre, London

The motion of a train loosens the tongue, confides Pozdnyshev, our companion in a railway carriage for the 85 minutes of this extraordinarily compelling stage adaptation of Tolstoy's great, warped novella The Kreutzer Sonata. In Natalie Abrahami's pitch-perfect production at the tiny Gate Theatre, this figure is a kind of bourgeois Russian Ancient Mariner, compelled to re-tell the story of how he murdered his arguably adulterous wife. She may have been playing more than piano with a newly arrived violinist, who had been a childhood friend of Pozdnyshev. Emphasising the subjective nature of the protagonist's testimony, this couple are seen here fitfully illuminated behind a scrim either making music or love in candle-lit flashes that are like the lingering neuralgic throb of an obsession that has survived Pozdnyshev's acquittal for homicide.

Wealth Check: 'I want to pay off my debts but still live comfortably'

Alma Stewart-Burgess, 39, is bringing up two young children aged seven and five in Preston after her 44-year-old journalist husband died from cancer five years ago. She is looking for a job after completing a postgraduate diploma in newspaper journalism at the University of Central Lancashire. "I want to be debt free, but still able to live comfortably," says Alma.

Wealth Check: 'I want to pay off my debts, train as a healer –

Linda Rostron, 44, works at the Houses of Parliament as a computer operator. Over the years she has built up a number of debts and wants to clear these, without giving up all her luxuries. Linda eventually hopes to train as an alternative therapist to boost her income but is finding training courses prohibitively expensive.

Into thin air: Did Steve Fossett fake his own death?

Last September, America's great aviation daredevil took off on a routine solo flight, and was never seen again. Now, as allegations of an elaborate double life begin to emerge, investigators are questioning whether he really died – or even crashed – at all. In Nevada, Guy Adams pieces together the evidence