Life Insurance

The Kreutzer Sonata, Gate Theatre, London

The motion of a train loosens the tongue, confides Pozdnyshev, our companion in a railway carriage for the 85 minutes of this extraordinarily compelling stage adaptation of Tolstoy's great, warped novella The Kreutzer Sonata. In Natalie Abrahami's pitch-perfect production at the tiny Gate Theatre, this figure is a kind of bourgeois Russian Ancient Mariner, compelled to re-tell the story of how he murdered his arguably adulterous wife. She may have been playing more than piano with a newly arrived violinist, who had been a childhood friend of Pozdnyshev. Emphasising the subjective nature of the protagonist's testimony, this couple are seen here fitfully illuminated behind a scrim either making music or love in candle-lit flashes that are like the lingering neuralgic throb of an obsession that has survived Pozdnyshev's acquittal for homicide.

Wealth Check: 'I want to buy my own home within five years'

Rachael Greaves, 25, from Cambridge, wants to get on the property ladder, but is worried about her savings depreciating in the current economic climate. Rachael says: "I want to buy my own home within five years." However, without a clear savings plan, she fears it may not be possible. A £30,000 inheritance in shares from her grandfather may help, but it has slumped in value in the last year. Rachael is therefore concerned about the continued risk of investing.

Wealth Check: 'I want to pay off my debts, train as a healer –

Linda Rostron, 44, works at the Houses of Parliament as a computer operator. Over the years she has built up a number of debts and wants to clear these, without giving up all her luxuries. Linda eventually hopes to train as an alternative therapist to boost her income but is finding training courses prohibitively expensive.

Into thin air: Did Steve Fossett fake his own death?

Last September, America's great aviation daredevil took off on a routine solo flight, and was never seen again. Now, as allegations of an elaborate double life begin to emerge, investigators are questioning whether he really died – or even crashed – at all. In Nevada, Guy Adams pieces together the evidence