Money Neil Woodford is bemused by the speed with which economic commentators have moved from doom to euphoria

The biggest fund manager story of 2013 was the resignation of Neil Woodford from Invesco Perpetual. As you will be aware, Mr Woodford will continue to manage the Invesco Perpetual Income and High Income Funds until he leaves at the end of April, following which he will set up his own company.

Mirror halts shares fall with defence of finances

Trinity Mirror was forced to make a formal statement on its financial health yesterday after analyst concerns spooked the market and the media group's stock dropped by 18.6 per cent in a single day.

Treasury on back foot as deputy Governor quits

One of the City's most high-profile economists, Rachel Lomax, is quitting her role as deputy Governor of the Bank of England at the end of June.

Jeremy Warner's Outlook: Banks and their capital needs – first they pay it out, now they want it all back again

Now UBM wants to switch tax domicile; UK budget deficit faces EU strictures

A £50bn injection, but the patient won't be up and about soon

The Bank of England is trying to get lenders back to work by swapping gilts for 'toxic' assets. Simon Evans asks if it has left the cure too late

Minutes show MPC split over rate cut

A three-way split appeared in the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) when it met two weeks ago, it has emerged, potentially reducing the likelihood of further rate cuts in the months ahead.

B&B says funding is secure despite rise in bad debt

A rise in bad debts, the departure of its operating director and further write-downs on investments were not enough to prevent Bradford & Bingley insisting yesterday it had been right to rule out fund-raisings such as a rights issue.

Jeremy Warner's Outlook: It ill becomes bankers who complain of lack of liquidity to be paying bumper dividends

Dunstone: talking his book on broadband; Stagflation makes an unwelcome return

Leading article: Toxic debts and the need for more liquidity

Today's breakfast meeting between Gordon Brown and executives from the financial sector will not be the first such get-together since Mr Brown became Prime Minister; but it will certainly be the most sombre. The global credit crunch shows no signs of abating and the threat of recession seems to grow larger by the week.

Bank of England fails to satisfy City hunger for funds

Britain's banks were left short-changed again yesterday after the Bank of England made only £13.6bn available for them to borrow – nearly three times less than they wanted.

King pledges more cash to help banks' liquidity

The Governor of the Bank of England yesterday pledged to continue supporting liquidity-starved banks, but stopped short of promising to buy worthless mortgage-backed securities.

Leading article: The urgency of the crisis demands radical action

Anyone who thinks that the United States is the land where the free market is allowed to let rip while Britain is the home of regulation and state intervention should study the different reactions of central banks to the crisis in the money markets that has been with us since September.

Scramble for funds as Bank of England auctions £10bn

Bank shares rebound on hopes worst of crisis is over; Lehman and Goldman figures reassure

Fed injects $140bn in attempt to calm credit turmoil

The US Federal Reserve moved to inject liquidity into the financial system yesterday as market turmoil increased and dire US employment numbers shook investor confidence.

Jeremy Warner's Outlook: Fed takes more action over credit crisis

Now into its third phase, that dastardly credit crisis simply refuses to go away. When the crisis first hit last August, I somewhat complacently dismissed it as just another temporary squall which would likely have an eventual cathartic effect by blowing off the excesses of the boom before they got completely out of hand.

Hamish McRae: Don't worry: when the regulators are fretting, things are returning to normal

When the monetary and banking regulators are worried we should really be scared, right? Er, no, wrong. The time for the rest of us to be concerned was when the regulators were too relaxed, as they were a year or more ago. Now that they running around saying that things are terrible I think we can start to relax a bit. That does not mean the banking crisis is past, for we still have a way to go. It is just the gradual correction process is taking place and that once that passes normal service will be resumed.

Life and Style
health
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Lena Headey as Cersei Lannister
TVSPOILER ALERT: It's all coming together as series returns to form
Sport
footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
Voices
Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Arts and Entertainment
Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
tvName confirmed for third series
Sport
Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
art
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine