Arts and Entertainment Strum as you are: Kurt Cobain

What is the best gig you've been to at Brixton Academy? Perhaps it's Public Enemy, or The Smiths' final show in 1986? Simon Parkes bought the seminal venue for £1 in 1982 and what stories he has to tell in his new memoir Live at the Brixton Academy: a Riotous Life in the Music Business.

Leading article: The sound of silence

The road to hell is paved with unintended consequences. The Government routinely proclaims its intention of supporting the growth of Britain's music sector. And quite right, too: there are young votes in it, and sizeable foreign earnings. Music generates about one per cent of the nation's income, with live music the fastest growing part of a troubled industry.

Live music being killed by 'cocktail of legislation'

Music venues and ancient pubs are being forced to close as new neighbours complain, reports Kevin Rawlinson

Police revise 'racist' events risk form

Bowing to pressure from a growing coalition of race activists and urban music stars, the Metropolitan Police today agreed to revise a controversial method of monitoring gigs which critics have labelled "potentially racist".

Shrop' till you drop ... discover secret hills and learn new skills

British breaks: Shropshire

Terence Blacker: Where are the guitar riots and accordian assaults?

This Government has developed a bizarre hatred for a certain kind of live music

The day live music died

A new layer of government bureaucracy is threatening to pull the plug on pub rock. Andy McSmith reports

Fearne Cotton to replace Jo Whiley

Jo Whiley is to be dropped from her prime Radio 1 morning slot after eight years, with Fearne Cotton taking over.

Tom Tom Crew, E4 Udderbelly, London

Tom Tom would be lost without Thum

OFT inquiry threatens Live Nation 'megadeal'

The proposed $2.5bn (£1.5bn) merger between live music giants Ticketmaster Entertainment and Live Nation was yesterday thrown into doubt after it was referred for a second regulatory inquiry, this time in the UK.

Mood music can help babies cope with pain

Playing music to babies in hospital can ease their pain and help with feeding, according to research published today.

Leading article: Music-making without borders

You don't have to be a devotee of Handel – and estimations of his place in the musical canon differ – to appreciate the vision and planning that went into yesterday's Handel Day, arranged by the European Broadcasting Union, or to have enjoyed the result. Listeners feasted on 17 hours of live music relayed, as the world turned, from almost everywhere to almost everywhere else. But Handel Day was just one of many treats of cross-border music-making in recent days.

Old-school fashion

Vintage has long been a buzz word in the fashion industry, bandied around by designers and celebrities alike. No fashion connoisseur should be without at least one timeless, classic vintage designer piece, but what about us mere mortals and penniless students?

Financial crisis 'caused by white men with blue eyes'

With Brown at his side, Brazilian leader apportions blame for global recession

Thrifty Living: The best things in life can be free

Everyone's looking to save a little bit of extra cash at the moment. For some families, that may simply mean eating out a little a less, or getting rid of the cleaner and doing more home chores yourself. For others, however – those who have lost their jobs, for example, or those who are struggling to make their wages stretch to meet their monthly financial commitments – it may mean making much bigger sacrifices.

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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence