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London Art Museums

Coming soon in visual arts: From Australia to Margate

Australia: so much to see, so far to travel. Hence the most satisfying thing about this autumn's calendar is news that a bunch of top curators have edited 200 years of the nation's art and are delivering it to our doorsteps for £14 a ticket. Australia at the Royal Academy, London (21 Sept to 8 Dec), features work by settlers and indigenous people and, best of all, includes four paintings from Sidney Nolan's Ned Kelly series, the source of much mythology and fame.

In The Studio: Nicky Philipps, painter

Nicky Philipps is not happy when she admits me to her small though perfectly-formed studio bang in the heart of Kensington. She has just been sent the Royal Mail image of the stamp with her painting of the Queen, and is disappointed that they cropped her full-length image to a head shot, although she confesses that it was her choice to paint the Queen full length, complete with a complement of dogs — corgis and dorgis around her feet.

The ordinary couple who amassed an extraordinary collection of modern

On the surface, Herbert Vogel and his wife, Dorothy, lived an ordinary life in New York. Mr Vogel, who died on Sunday, aged 89, used to work nights sorting mail at the city's post offices, and his wife was a reference librarian in Brooklyn. But over the years, the couple built up one of the world's most unlikely – and most significant – collections of modern art, and bequeathed much of it to the National Gallery of Art in Washington.

Timon of Athens, Olivier, National Theatre, London

A profligate philanthropist goes bust, loses all his fawning fair-weather friends and bolts to the opposite extreme, becoming an even more fanatical misanthrope who rages at mankind in his self-imposed exile. 

More headlines

Home is where the art is, says Google

Until now, anyone who aspired to be well versed in the artistic highlights of the world's great galleries required time, money and a penchant for air travel. Soon, they will need just a laptop.

The crazy spirit of the age

A fascinating exhibition in Leeds recalls the vitality and exuberance of British sculpture in the Sixties and Seventies, says Adrian Hamilton