News The charity Stonewall revealed its Top 100 Employers list on Wednesday

Organisations to receive recognition from the charity include an NHS Trust, and a housing company

Letter: Royal Academy's malevolent critics

Royal Academy's malevolent critics

Letter: Cash clash

Sir: I am grateful for David Lister's kind piece about the ICA (11 April). There were two factual inaccuracies: Westminster cut our grant by pounds 36,500, not pounds 200,000; and, as much as I'd like to, I don't have the power to make the Clash re-form

Reviews: Correction

Correction:

Letter: Golden oldies

Sir: I have just bought a packet of "Hobnobs" biscuits. I note that they are "best before 05 April 97 AD". Who would be the more interested - the public health authorities or the British Museum?

Letter: Museum's entry charge dilemma

Sir: Sadly there are few museums now that allow free access, so the news about the British Museum comes as a depressing blow. The Government argues that people should pay for their entertainment. Museums are not there for entertainment: they are repositories of culture, history, and knowledge in a form that is unique.

Museum set to charge for admission

Admission charges of up to pounds 6 and redundancies of more than 20 per cent of the staff are likely at the British Museum.

annexe

Thank you for sending in so many requests for free tickets to the Royal Academy's Living Bridges exhibition; these are on their way to the first 25 envelopes opened. I am sorry to disappoint the rest of you. The exhibition continues until 18 December and is well worth a visit.

Letter:Late show

Sir: One simple measure which Charles Saumarez Smith ("How to pull them in off the streets", 25 June) didn't mention in his plans for London's galleries is to revise their archaic opening hours.

Letter: Hidden entry fee

Hidden entry fee

Letter: Sainsburys' gift

From Mr Bamber Gascoigne

Letter : V&A director's fine achievements

From Mr George Levy

Where shall we meet?: The Piccadilly W1

Bliss. Upstairs at the Piccadilly is one of the best places to eat near Theatreland. They've been there years - the sign on the outside still proclaims the place to be the Little Cottage - and their beams-and-chianti-bottle decor is much beloved by their droves of regulars. Their chicken wings with roasted peppers on the side are the kind of starter that make your friend who ordered something sensible weep with jealousy, but the quantities are such that you can offer them around with total insouciance. Be sure to spill crumbs on the tablecloth, because then a nice man will come along between courses with a hand-held 'hoover' and clean them up.

Appeals: The American Friends of the British Museum

The American Friends of the British Museum, an American charity, is raising funds for the British Museum's new North American Gallery, scheduled to open in 1997. The museum has one of the most important collections of North American archaeology and ethnography outside the United States and Canada, most of it at the moment housed in the Museum of Mankind. The new gallery will built in the old British Library premises in Bloomsbury, and will comprise one of four sections of the 'Gallery of the Americas'. The Friends are holding a fund-raising jazz evening on Wednesday 15 June, in the museum's classical sculpture galleries. For tickets and details, contact:

Royal Academy selection committee

Royal Academy students displaying paintings yesterday before the summer exhibition selection committee. The judges were making their choices for this year's show, which opens on 5 June. Last year the exhibition attracted 13,210 entries, of which 1,798 were chosen.

Royal Academy entries

Marisa Lintlin-Masters arrives at the Royal Academy, London, with the portrait entered by her daughter for the summer exhibition.
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