Long-distance Track Running

Nearing the end: January is the beginning of the end for third years,

They say that in relationships there come several itching points. These are moot: could be two years or five; some even say 18 months. If I’m in a relationship with university – heartbreak, check; crying, check – then we’ve reached one of these hurdles. And the cut-off is not a year or even two, it’s in weeks. Let me introduce the 12-week itch.

Mo Farah - polite man

And now, in nice-man news, Mo Farah has run to the defence of an interviewer ridiculed for not realising she was talking to a double Olympic champion.

I'm playing catch-Rupp in training, admits Mo Farah

Mo Farah admits he is playing catch-up after taking an extended post-Olympics break. "I am not in terrible shape but I am behind my training partner – a month and bit behind him," the 5,000 metres and 10,000m gold medal winner confessed.

Paula Radcliffe's axed funding 'not due to her age'

Neil Black, the new performance director of UK Athletics, stressed last night that Paula Radcliffe's omission from the governing body's Lottery funding list – the World Class Performance Programme roster for 2012-13 – had nothing to do with her age, and pointed out that two elder stateswomen of the sport have been named on the list for the first annual phase of the build-up towards the Rio Games in 2016.

Eat & Run, by Scott Jurek

How did you spend the past 24 hours? Probably not in the same way as Scott Jurek did one day in May 2010, when at the age of 36 he ran non-stop for 165.7 miles, setting an American record.

More headlines

British athletes on verge of golden era, says Van Commenee

Britain's runners, jumpers and throwers flew into London yesterday on a back-to-the-future mission. The declared ambition of the home track-and-field team, when the action gets under way in the showpiece Olympic Stadium on Friday, is to launch a new golden era and to take the public profile of British athletics back to the heady days of the 1970s and 1980s.

Great Britain's athletes on verge of golden era – Charles van

Britain's runners, jumpers and throwers flew into London yesterday on a back-to-the-future mission. The declared ambition of the home track-and-field team, when the action gets away in the showpiece Olympic Stadium on Friday, is to launch a new golden era and to take the public profile of British athletics back to the heady days of the 1970s and 1980s.