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Louise Bourgeois

Another decade of grand Turbine Hall installations secured as Tate

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

The Life of the Mind: Love, Sorrow and Obsession, New Art Gallery,

This group show with a rather grandiose title has been curated by a Turner-shortlisted male artist who goes by the name of Bob and Roberta Smith. Smith has been artist-in-residence at the New Art Gallery, Walsall, combing through a remarkable archive of the works and personal effects of Jacob Epstein, which were bequeathed to the city by Epstein's widow in 1973.

Martin Creed: Mothers, Hauser & Wirth, Savile Row, London

This twinset of behemoth galleries near Savile Row, opened by Hauser & Wirth last October, feel more like something that you would find in the post-industrial landscape of New York's Chelsea gallery district, than they do premises located on London's historic tailoring street. They opened with an exhibition of work by the late Louise Bourgeois – her menacing, crouching steel spider sculpture patrolling the galleries. And so, now, we welcome Martin Creed to the space to give it to give it a lick of his likeable shtick. The Turner Prize-winning artist often works in a rule-based way – regularly letting his materials dictate the work. Some of the paintings in this exhibition are made by taking a set of brushes and making a single stripe with every size, so that you end up with something that looks like a set of stairs or a stack of colour, in yellow, green or pink. They are like comical Frank Stellas: they are what they are. What they are, in this show, however, is overabundant, and the hang is a bit hodgepodge.

Stunning visuals: Redstone Diary 2011

The ever popular Redstone Diary returns with the 2011 version which takes ‘The Artist's World’ as it's theme. This edition follows on from the successful Russian Diary.

The Diary: Anton Edelmann; Kenwood House; Joana Vasconcelos; Neil

Anton Edelmann, the former Savoy chef whose protégés include the young Giorgio Locatelli, was at Sotheby's in London this week, serving guests and fellow gourmands including Locatelli, Brian Mosimann, Mark Hix and John Williams, a 16th-century recipe for cooking dor-mice. Edelmann tells me he selected a menu based around ancient recipes including one for that Roman delicacy, the humble dormouse. While he did not stay completely true to the original – he used rabbit – he thinks 16th- century recipes can be adapted for contemporary palates. "Dormouse was a delicacy, it wasn't because they could find nothing else to eat. The only reason I stuck it on the menu is because it tickled me. The guests liked it, it tickled them, too." His feast was made to celebrate the sale, Books for Cooks, of a private collection of culinary literature from the 16th century to the present day, compiled by Stanley J Seeger. As well as Apicius Coelieus's mock dormouse dish on Edelmann's menu were canapés from Athenaeus, peaches à la Verenne, and chocolates from a 1644 text.

Tracey Emin: Craft work

This week, the Royal Academy of Arts presents the first retrospective of Tracey Emin's monoprints. To celebrate, she talks to Arifa Akbar and introduces an exclusive offer

A room of my own: Fashion designer Jemima French opens the doors to

Jemima French launched her fashion line Frost French with childhood friend Sadie Frost in 1999. Since then, Kate Moss, Helena Christensen and Jerry Hall have all modelled for the label. French, who is 44, lives in Camden, north London, with her boyfriend, Francis Ridley, and her four daughters, who are aged between seven and 19. Frost French has two London shops, in Islington and Soho. For details or to shop online, visit frostfrench.com

All about Eva Hesse

A collection of the sculptor Eva Hesse's diminutive, experimental works flirts with recognisable forms. It's life, but not quite as we know it, says Tom Lubbock

More headlines

Revealed: how Turner began his career copying the old masters

JMW Turner has gone down in history as one of the most innovative landscape painters of the 19th century. But now a blockbuster exhibition is to shed new light on a lesser known side of Turner: his obsession to prove he was just as good, if not better, than the old masters whose virtuosity he so admired.

Middle England will love my show - Tracey Emin

Tracey Emin has revealed that she deliberately set out to be provocative when she was asked by the Royal Academy to hang a gallery in its Summer Exhibition because she thought that was what was expected of her.

Cultural Life: Fyfe Dangerfield, Musician


I start so many books and then get distracted. I've just read The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It is the story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, who wrote the book by blinking the letters of the alphabet because he was paralysed everywhere else. It is strange how uplifting it is to read – it makes you appreciate the small things in life. The other book I've read is The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It is about the end of the world, and describes a journey taken by a father and son. As post-apocalyptic survivors, they wander through America. It's quite a long book but is aimless because what are they walking towards? They are walking to stay alive. Both of these books get to the root of what it means to be alive.