News Delhi's Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal addresses his supporters during a protest in New Delhi

At around 3pm on Monday afternoon the Delhi traffic police issued an unlikely-sounding message by means of social media.

Amritsar: jewel in the Sikh crown

From Vancouver to Wolverhampton, turbaned devotees flock to the holy city's Golden Temple, which is back in the headlines following a visit from the Queen. Jonathan Gregson went too, and managed, amongst other things, to be hailed as an honorary Sikh

Power before prayer

It is time for Tibetans to ignore the Dalai Lama's policy of non- violence, argues John Billington

Queen to visit hotspots on tour of subcontinent

The Queen and Prince Philip today begin their tour of India and Pakistan, the first since 1983. It will be a mixture of run-of-the-mill state banquets, investitures and gestures of royal politesse with a few livelier and more unlikely items.

Obituary: Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Mother Teresa of Calcutta was the founder of the Missionaries of Charity, an order of 3,000 nuns and 400 brothers in 87 countries, tending to the poor and destitute in the slums of 160 cities, running 81 homes for the dying and treating six million sick people annually in 670 mobile clinics.

Radio: The soul of a nation finds utterance at last

In Delhi the chimes of midnight tinkled prettily, as from a coal mantlepiece on a hot summer's night. Yet these very bells announced a moment of echoing resonance, for it was At the Stroke of Midnight (R4) on 15 August 1947 that India and Pakistan gained independence from the worst and the best of the British Raj. Nehru's tremendous speech recognised its significance: "On the stroke of the midnight hour, when the world sleeps, India will awaken to a life of freedom," he said. At last "the soul of a nation, long-suppressed, finds utterance".

Saga of Mahatma memorial shows spiritual father has no place in people's hearts

Mohandas Gandhi is invariably described as the father of the Indian nation. Only the reckless take his name in vain: when a campaigner for homosexual rights described him on a television chat show here two years ago as a "bastard grocer", or words to that effect, the show was axed, the executives of Rupert Murdoch's Star television channel made to apologise, parliament went into special session and the outspoken fellow was sued by one of Gandhi's grandsons.

The legacy of midnight, marked in Britain, Pakistan and India

Indian independence 50 years on: Border party may soothe the wounds of partition

Saint and spinner: Denis Judd unravels the Mahatma myth

Rediscovering Gandhi by Yogesh Chadha, Century, pounds 20

Book review / India's great soul

RABINDRANATH TAGORE: An Anthology Picador pounds 20 SELECTED LETTERS OF RABINDRANATH TAGORE Cambridge pounds 60 both edited by Krishna Dutta, Andrew Robinson

Operation Madhouse

Review: LIBERTY OR DEATH: India's Journey to Independence and Division by Patrick French HarperCollins pounds 20

Spirit of India rises to celebrate freedom

Images of independence

Fifty years of freedom for spirit of India ...

... but Gandhi's legacy still fails to bring unity

Three on view Actors on the move

Ben Kingsley, the screen embodiment of Mahatma Gandhi, is selling Pebworth House, near Stratford-upon-Avon. "Piping" Pebworth, one of the eight Shakespearean villages, is in the Vale of Evesham. The main wing of Pebworth House - Grade II listed - is Georgian, with well-proportioned rooms. It has six bedrooms over two floors, plus a granny flat. There are three further bedrooms in a detached cottage in the grounds. The landscaped gardens include a courtyard with a central pond and garden room with a plunge pool as well as a garage and stable block. Offers in the region of pounds 495,000 through Strutt & Parker (01608 650502) and Bigwood (01789 294444).

Madam makes a move

Having turned her back on public life after her husband's murder, Sonia Gandhi is back on the podium. Jan McGirk examines whether the legacy of being part of India's major political dynasty will be too much for the Italian-born widow to bear

The man who abolished madness

R D Laing regarded psychiatry as akin to penology, designed mainly to keep mad people out of society's way
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