Mahatma Gandhi

Bite-size books: Abridged too far?

So much to learn, so little time... In every publisher's catalogue, you'll find the slenderest volumes on the biggest subjects. But huge concepts can't simply be boiled down into bite-size books, argues John Walsh

New power generation: The world leaders of tomorrow

Every politician talks of building a better tomorrow. But who will actually be in charge in 20 years' time? Our foreign correspondents meet the promising young men and women from around the world who are already on the path to power

The Timeline: Nobel Prizes

Shortly before his death in 1896, Swedish scientist Alfred Nobel – the inventor of dynamite – bequeathed 94 per cent of his wealth towards the creation of five prizes to "those who, during the preceding year, shall have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind". In 1901, the first winners were announced. The first Prize for Literature didn't go to Leo Tolstoy but to poet Sully Prudhomme. Awards were also given in physics, chemistry, peace and medicine.

48 Hours In: Mumbai

Autumn is the ideal time to visit India’s most cosmopolitan city – with plenty to nourish the body and soul

Gandhi: Naked Ambition, By Jad Adams
Jinnah: India, Partition,

At school in India, our history teachers told us the conventional narrative of India's independence, with the blame of the Partition falling squarely on the British. There was a clear hero – Mohandas Gandhi – and an obvious villain – Mohammed Ali Jinnah. We recognised our hero from our bank notes and from the name of the main roads. Gandhi was that ascetic saint who told us to respect everything, love everyone, and taught us that you could win over enemies through the power of moral persuasion. He sank the might of an empire in a fistful of salt. Richard Attenborough's 1982 film, Gandhi, shows that scene in its panoramic splendour.

Pandora: A Labour of love for film-maker Chadha

With the notable exception of a retired Dr Who (quiet at the back, Mr Tennant) the Labour Party has, thus far, been rather short of A-list supporters for its election campaign. While the Tories wheel out Sir Michael Caine and Carol Vorderman and the Liberal Democrats boast Daniel Radcliffe and Colin Firth, Labour has been left out in the cold, or so it seems.

Sir Ben Kingsley: 'I was blessed by being a very popular child

Here's a pub-quiz question: which one-time TV actor in Coronation Street and Crown Court released a record on which he sang selections from The King and I with Julie Andrews, before being told by two of the Beatles that he should really take up a musical career? You want a clue? His middle name is Pandit and he once played Doctor Watson to Michael Caine's Sherlock Holmes... Give up? Have another go: which Oscar-winning Yorkshireman appeared in Peter Hall's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, played The Hood in the movie version of Thunderbirds, and appeared as himself in an episode of The Sopranos?

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Maharaja: the splendour of India's Royal Courts, V&A, London

It would be difficult to find a more visually ravishing show than this one in the whole of London. The objects – from palm leaf fronds on the end of tapering silver stems to cool an emperor's brow, to the silver accoutrements of an elephant; from gorgeous Indian miniatures showing shapely young female royals depending, languorously, from the end of a kite, to paintings of tremendous royal processions that seem to go on and on and on, at such a languid pace, until we run out of wall space – are dazzling, and the setting, from first to last, coyly razzmatazz.

Pen will 'evoke spirit of Gandhi' – for £14,000

Little is recorded about Mahatma Gandhi's choice of writing implement, but one thing is clear: when the great ascetic set down the ideas that would prompt a generation of Indians to a peaceful revolution, he probably did so with a pen that cost rather less than £14,000.