News Delhi's Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal addresses his supporters during a protest in New Delhi

At around 3pm on Monday afternoon the Delhi traffic police issued an unlikely-sounding message by means of social media.

'It would make a good Ealing comedy,' said our lady of the protest. 'Carry On Hunting!'

Eye witness: Fox-hunters pledge civil disobedience to defy a ban on their sport. By Severin Carrell

Lt-Gen K. P. Candeth

Indian army officer who liberated Goa from Portuguese rule

Step Across This Line: collected non-fiction 1992-2002 by Salman Rushdie

Travel has not broadened Rushdie's mind

The Cripps Version: the life of Sir Stafford Cripps, by Peter Clarke

Faded but not forgotten mark of yesterday's man

Flat Earth: Hols are off

Because of its "secular" constitution and the need to be equally nice to all religions, India has an abnormally large number of public holidays, including Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Prophet Mohammed's birthday, Christmas Day, and others with charming names such as Holi, Pongal and Onam.

The week in Westminster: Hague's generalship in action: Commons lion fired by donkeys

IT IS beyond comprehension that the Tories should have sacked Shaun Woodward (Witney) as their spokesman for London because of his sensible refusal to defend the infamous Clause 28, the law that prevents councils or schools from "promoting" homosexuality. The discourteous manner by which he was fired by a pager message is even more disgraceful.

Books: How to play cricket under siege from your enemy

Ladysmith by Giles Foden Faber pounds 9.99

Letter: Simple side of the tracks

I WAS surprised to read the following in Mark Tully's otherwise excellent piece: "Mahatma Gandhi deliberately chose to travel third-class to demonstrate that he shared the suffering of the poor." How much the Mahatma suffered is questionable, for the whole third-class compartment was thoroughly cleaned and disinfected for him before he was left alone to meditate in peace. As Sarojini Maidu said: "Ah, if the Mahatma only knew what it costs us for him to lead the simple life..."

Obituary: Nirad C. Chaudhuri

NIRAD C. CHAUDHURI was India's most distinguished writer of English prose in the 20th century. He was also perhaps his country's most controversial commentator since Independence: a lonely position he never regretted, maintained with real courage and indeed grew to relish. Throughout his immensely long life, which began in Bengal in the year of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, the physically diminutive Chaudhuri was fiercely independent of received opinion; his energy, analytical power and impatience with cant were the antithesis of the oriental stereotypes he confronted in his dozen or so books in English and Bengali.

Country Matters: A close shave for Gandhi

The ancient Greeks had a phrase for it: the words meeden agan - nothing in excess - were inscribed on the wall of the temple at Delphi as a precept for life in general, and they remain a pretty good one to this day. But how do you interpret them when your free-range chickens are being written off by predators?

Obituary: James Farmer

THE NAME James Farmer may not be as familiar as others who devoted their lives to the struggle against racial segregation in the United States. Yet, until his death at the age of 79, historians saw Farmer as the last surviving member of the "Big Four" of the civil rights movement which emerged after 1945. Martin Luther King was murdered in 1968, Ray Wilkins died in 1971 and Whitney Young 10 years later.
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Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

Auschwitz liberation 70th anniversary

Woman sent to three Nazi death camps describes surviving gas chamber
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea