News Delhi's Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal addresses his supporters during a protest in New Delhi

At around 3pm on Monday afternoon the Delhi traffic police issued an unlikely-sounding message by means of social media.

Obituary: Fredda Brilliant

FREDDA BRILLIANT was a sculptress whose gypsy creativity drove her to all corners of the world, crossing political barriers without regard. In the Thirties in Moscow, she embarked on her career, which flourished in India in the Fifties and Sixties, with moments of personal triumph in London, and which she later took to the United States.

QUESTIONNAIRE: JO DURIE - THE FORMER BRITISH TENNIS PLAYER

Who is the most exciting player, man or woman, in the world today?

Arts: The Week In Radio - It's easy to mock

BEWARE OF the dog - the distinguished installation artist Bill Fontana was the latest cultural postman to have his ankles nipped by the Airedale John Humphrys (Today, Radio 4, Thursday). Fontana had had the temerity to create a rather intriguing sound sculpture of waves breaking on the shore at Cape Trafalgar for the National Maritime Museum. The Airedale chortled rudely with ersatz mateyness, and the courteous and long-suffering American was abruptly faded out, leaving the Humph to go home to his Millennium Dome prints and Vera Lynn 78s.

Will no one challenge this god?

THIS YEAR'S Reith lectures, given by Anthony Giddens, ended last night. Am I the only person on this planet who found most (not all) of what I heard unconvincing, at times even trite?

The Saturday Profile: Sonia Gandhi, Indian Politician - The widow who would be queen

THIS WAS the week that Sonia Gandhi very nearly became India's new prime minister. Yesterday her scheme came unstuck, and the Congress, the party of which she is president, conceded that its attempt to glue together enough small parties to form a coalition had failed. But it was a close-run thing. And on the other side of the general election that now appears almost certain, it could well happen.

Gandhi stakes claim to India builds power base

THE SHAPE of India's new government, led by Sonia Gandhi's Congress party, will become clear by this evening, according to one of the key powerbrokers in the political wrangling.

Notebook: Gandhi's luck to miss the spiteful press

THINKING ABOUT the fate of England's football coach, as every newspaper and news-show insists we must, I have also been thinking about Mahatma Gandhi. Agreed: the connections made by the human mind are sometimes very strange.

Shape of Arts to Come: No 3: Comedy - Tommy Tiernan: I'm a comedian. I don't do gags

You want jokes? You've come to the wrong place. The crack-a-minute school of comedy is dead. By James Rampton

Travel: Long Haul - Build a bridge to heaven

Gandhi was born near Porbandar's boatyard, where Kenneth Wilson met a hundred eager pilgrims

City Life: Delhi - Ding dong! Time for Christmas baksheesh

ON MY FRONT door in Nizamuddin, I have just hung up a huge red and green wreath, made from dried chilli peppers, to spice up my holiday mood and to discourage a marauding monkey who has been mooching around our neighbourhood.

Lesbian love that inflames hatred

`If women's physical needs get fulfilled like this, marriage and society will collapse,' said one critic

Obituary: P. N. Haksar

P. N. HAKSAR was an intellectual powerhouse and one of India's most successful strategists who astutely established the political omnipotence of a weak prime minister, Indira Gandhi, through populist measures in the Sixties and early Seventies. He also served as ambassador to several countries and was one of India's few remaining Cold Warriors and die-hard socialists, instrumental in negotiating a timely military pact with the Soviet Union before the third war with neighbouring Pakistan in 1971, to counter any interference by its ally, the United States.

Cartier-Bresson: What's the story?

The photographs of Henri Cartier-Bresson are now regarded as great art, but in the early part of his career, he was producing tough photojournalis m, covering everything from Gandhi's funeral to the new Kennedy administration. As an exhibition opens at the V&A to mark his 90th birthday, Colin Jacobson considers this forgotten legacy

Was Jinnah a saint or sinner?

Lord Mountbatten called Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, a vain, evil genius. A new film attempts to rehabilitate him as a tolerant secularist and as the model for a modern Muslim leader.

Historical Notes: People who refuse to believe in `never'

STUDY ANY paper any day and it will be full of cries of protest - in the news columns, letters to the editor or articles by columnists. Protest makes news - but do protest movements help to change the world? Are the wicked heresies of today destined to become, as the British political philosopher Harold Laski once observed, the sober commonplaces of tomorrow?
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The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution