Life and Style

Johanes Kepler, who was born on 27 December 1771, was born near Stuttgart and made his foray into astronomy after he worked as a maths teacher in Graz, Austria - where he became an associate of Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg.

Codebreaker Alan Turing

Alan Turing gets royal pardon for 'gross indecency' – 61 years after he poisoned himself

He was the father of modern computing whose work on the Enigma code at Bletchley Park  is said to have shortened the Second World War.

Ringo Starr will voice the character of Fibonacci Sequins in the anniversary Powerpuff Girls episode

Ringo Starr cast in special episode of The Powerpuff Girls

The Beatles drummer will guest star in a 15th anniversary special next month

Book of a lifetime: Cyclopaedia, By Ephraim Chambers

As a historian of 18th-century London, it would be too predictable to choose Samuel Johnson's great Dictionary of 1775 as my choice for a book with enduring impact. There is no doubt that Johnson's work had a pivotal role in defining our modern language, but in terms of cultural significance, there's another book which is almost equally important: Ephraim Chambers's Cyclopaedia.

Google Doodle celebrates French physicist Léon Foucault’s 194th birthday with pendulum tribute

Foucault pendulum is a simple device introduced in 1851 to confirm that the earth rotated

Can you crack a code? If so, you could join GCHQ

Cheltenham listening post is setting an online challenge to find the next generation of codebreakers

Yet another dubious equation – describing a recipe for a beloved late-night snack – has left some mathematicians unimpressed

Perfect cheese on toast: If b=bread, c=cheese and t=time, what is the point of all these formulae?

Yet another dubious equation – describing a recipe for a beloved late-night snack – has left some mathematicians unimpressed

Johnson- Thompson just failed to overhaul her medal rivals in the 800m

World Championships 2013: No medal for 'new Ennis,' but Katarina Johnson-Thompson shows she is here to stay

After missing bronze by just 28 points, she has a bright future to come

The pair have teamed up to make a documentary on the world of “nature, technology and music” which airs today

When Björk Met Attenborough: The Icelandic punk, the national treasure and a display of rather remarkable human behaviour

Ahead of the airing of a documentary made with the acclaimed naturalist, the eccentric musician tells Sarah Morrison how the pair found common ground in each other's fields

Enigma codebreaker Alan Turing to receive posthumous pardon for homosexuality conviction

The Government says it will not oppose a parliamentary bill that would quash the 1952 'gross indecency' conviction

Academics deride league tables that guide Michael Gove's reforms

Utterly wrong! Flawed! Academics deride league tables that guide Michael Gove's reforms

Model used to calculate triennial rankings contains 'profound' error, says mathematician

The paper raises the question of whether alien races could have used the gravity of stars to “slingshot” probes in order to gain speed: a technique humans already use for probes, such as the Voyager.

Self-replicating alien space probes could already be in our solar system, say mathematicians

Mathematicians analysed the possibility that probes could travel through space in a study published in the Journal of Astrobiology

Jimmy Anderson celebrates after taking the wicket of Ashton Agar at Trent Bridge

Ashes 2013: The complete package - how James Anderson became England’s go-to man

Anderson’s precision with the ball was staggering

Last week, we printed a selection of the world’s most highbrow jokes

More highbrow jokes: We didn’t realise what we were starting

We carried a selection and you responded in kind - here are our favourite 25

The Sutton Trust says GCSE maths does not give pupils the skills they need in the modern world of work

Students to study maths until the age of 18

All pupils should have compulsory maths lessons up until the age of 18 - even if they have a top GCSE grade in the subject, says a report out today.

Norman Routledge: Inspirational teacher and mathematician

In recent times, academics tend to be valued, judged and honoured by their research achievements and the number and quality of papers they have had published in learned journals. Great teachers have not been appreciated, as they once were.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine