Life and Style

Johanes Kepler, who was born on 27 December 1771, was born near Stuttgart and made his foray into astronomy after he worked as a maths teacher in Graz, Austria - where he became an associate of Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg.

Codebreaker Alan Turing

Alan Turing gets royal pardon for 'gross indecency' – 61 years after he poisoned himself

He was the father of modern computing whose work on the Enigma code at Bletchley Park  is said to have shortened the Second World War.

Ringo Starr will voice the character of Fibonacci Sequins in the anniversary Powerpuff Girls episode

Ringo Starr cast in special episode of The Powerpuff Girls

The Beatles drummer will guest star in a 15th anniversary special next month

Book of a lifetime: Cyclopaedia, By Ephraim Chambers

As a historian of 18th-century London, it would be too predictable to choose Samuel Johnson's great Dictionary of 1775 as my choice for a book with enduring impact. There is no doubt that Johnson's work had a pivotal role in defining our modern language, but in terms of cultural significance, there's another book which is almost equally important: Ephraim Chambers's Cyclopaedia.

Google Doodle celebrates French physicist Léon Foucault’s 194th birthday with pendulum tribute

Foucault pendulum is a simple device introduced in 1851 to confirm that the earth rotated

Can you crack a code? If so, you could join GCHQ

Cheltenham listening post is setting an online challenge to find the next generation of codebreakers

Yet another dubious equation – describing a recipe for a beloved late-night snack – has left some mathematicians unimpressed

Perfect cheese on toast: If b=bread, c=cheese and t=time, what is the point of all these formulae?

Yet another dubious equation – describing a recipe for a beloved late-night snack – has left some mathematicians unimpressed

Johnson- Thompson just failed to overhaul her medal rivals in the 800m

World Championships 2013: No medal for 'new Ennis,' but Katarina Johnson-Thompson shows she is here to stay

After missing bronze by just 28 points, she has a bright future to come

The pair have teamed up to make a documentary on the world of “nature, technology and music” which airs today

When Björk Met Attenborough: The Icelandic punk, the national treasure and a display of rather remarkable human behaviour

Ahead of the airing of a documentary made with the acclaimed naturalist, the eccentric musician tells Sarah Morrison how the pair found common ground in each other's fields

Enigma codebreaker Alan Turing to receive posthumous pardon for homosexuality conviction

The Government says it will not oppose a parliamentary bill that would quash the 1952 'gross indecency' conviction

Academics deride league tables that guide Michael Gove's reforms

Utterly wrong! Flawed! Academics deride league tables that guide Michael Gove's reforms

Model used to calculate triennial rankings contains 'profound' error, says mathematician

The paper raises the question of whether alien races could have used the gravity of stars to “slingshot” probes in order to gain speed: a technique humans already use for probes, such as the Voyager.

Self-replicating alien space probes could already be in our solar system, say mathematicians

Mathematicians analysed the possibility that probes could travel through space in a study published in the Journal of Astrobiology

Jimmy Anderson celebrates after taking the wicket of Ashton Agar at Trent Bridge

Ashes 2013: The complete package - how James Anderson became England’s go-to man

Anderson’s precision with the ball was staggering

Last week, we printed a selection of the world’s most highbrow jokes

More highbrow jokes: We didn’t realise what we were starting

We carried a selection and you responded in kind - here are our favourite 25

The Sutton Trust says GCSE maths does not give pupils the skills they need in the modern world of work

Students to study maths until the age of 18

All pupils should have compulsory maths lessons up until the age of 18 - even if they have a top GCSE grade in the subject, says a report out today.

Norman Routledge: Inspirational teacher and mathematician

In recent times, academics tend to be valued, judged and honoured by their research achievements and the number and quality of papers they have had published in learned journals. Great teachers have not been appreciated, as they once were.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk