News Bloodbath of nostalgia: Michael Grade is preparing to say farewell to BBC Television Centre which is to be turned into a £200m complex of shops and offices

Lord Grade, the former chairman of both the BBC  and ITV, has been suggested as a potential "mediator" who could help broker the current impasse over future press regulation.

Nobody could watch sale of BBC Television Centre without a pang of regret

The concentration of activities in this building endowed it with a special spirit

John Humphrys to receive Harvey Lee Award for George Entwistle grilling on Today programme

John Humphrys will today receive a prestigious broadcasting award following the Today programme interview in which his ruthless grilling of George Entwistle prompted the resignation of the BBC Director-General.

According to a new BBC4 documentary, 'Lights! Camera! Action! Tales of Television Centre' – some Play School presenters even went in front of the camera after smoking

Goodbye Television Centre: Stars gather to say farewell to London home of BBC

Familiar faces will gather to say a fond farewell to BBC Television Centre for a two-hour TV special as the corporation leaves one of its most recognisable homes after more than half a century.

Greg Dyke on Broadcasting

There must be a better way to run the Corporation than this

Grade and Thompson could go in bust-up over BBC licence fee

The positions of Michael Grade, the chairman of the BBC, and Mark Thompson, the director-general, are under threat over government proposals to give some of the corporation's licence fee to other broadcasters.

Mess with the BBC and you might just find you've lost another chairman

Michael Grade has made a decent job of reforming the way the corporation is governed, says Will Wyatt. A Green Paper that undermines him is not what's wanted

Greg Dyke on Broadcasting

Lord Burns's new proposals for the BBC make sense

BBC chief threatens to sack executives who miss targets

BBC chairman Michael Grade yesterday warned that the corporation's executives could be fired if their department failed to meet performance targets.

BBC chairman comes under fire for depicting businessmen as crooks

Michael Grade, the chairman of the BBC, yesterday launched a vigorous defence of the way business is portrayed on radio and television but there was one complaint he could not answer: why is Matt Crawford, the businessman in The Archers, the only character who plays the part of a crook?

Raymond Snoddy: Grade's choice: Cut jobs or lose funding

Since Michael Grade was appointed chairman of the BBC seven months ago, it has been clear radical change was on the way, and thousands of jobs could go at the corporation. After all, it was the personal manifesto he put to the Government to get the job.

Greg Dyke on television

The BBC needs a new top team, so farewell to the great and good
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
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The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

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It's oh so quiet!

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It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
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End of the Aussie brain drain

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Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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