Voices Labour leader Ed Miliband during a Q&A session at the Standard Life building in Edinburgh, Thursday 7 November

Some Labour figures worry that the party leader is overdoing the anti-business rhetoric

Donald Macintyre's Sketch: Owen Paterson, Cruella de Vil of the environment

Owen Paterson yesterday lived splendidly up to his image as the Tory Cruella De Vil, draped luxuriously in the fur of culled badgers, by pointing to other countries where once-loved species were being drastically thinned out by the authorities.

Francis Golding: Civil servant who went on to work with the likes of Rogers and Stirling and influenced the look of modern London

Francis Golding was one of the country's leading architectural, planning and conservation consultants, and had a big influence on the look of contemporary London. He died from injuries sustained in one of the cycling accidents that occurred in Central London on 5 November. Golding's major clients included Norman Foster, Richard Rogers, Terry Farrell, Rick Mather, Rafael Viñoli, Jean Nouvel and Michael Hopkins. With Foster he worked on the "Gherkin"; with Nouvel on One New Change, also in the City of London; and with Rogers he consulted on the controversial Chelsea Barracks. He was cross about the Prince of Wales's intervention, though in the case of the Prince's Poundbury development in Dorset, he said, "I've seen the past and it works."

Former Deputy Prime Minister, Lord Heseltine

Conservative Party conference: Lord Heseltine warns Tories over pact with 'racist' Ukip

Former Deputy Prime Minister likened Nigel Farage’s party to supporters of Enoch Powell in the 1960s

A bridge across London's north/south divide: Treasury gives £12bn Crossrail 2 project funds to get started

George Osborne and Danny Alexander put new London rail link at centre of multi-billion pound infrastructure plan

Ken Clarke (left) and Margaret Thatcher with Norman Tebbit at the 1985 Conservative Party conference in Blackpool

Margaret Thatcher's funeral set for Wednesday 17 April as stalwart Kenneth Clarke accuses left and right of peddling 'myths' over former prime minister

Debate over former prime minister's legacy intensifies as ex-chancellor says 'she took no notice of opinion polls'

Anthony Hilton: Trading up - Michael Heseltine’s brainchild matures

Heseltine set up the forum in the 1990s to help trade associations to raise their game

For and against Maggie: when the Iron Lady stood (almost) alone

There are twice as  many names in the  'against us' column as in the 'for us' one

Italy arrests Finmeccanica defence boss in helicopter bribes probe

The boss of Italy’s biggest defence company, Finmeccanica, and the top executive at its helicopter division, AgustaWestland, were arrested today in a corruption probe.

You’d have to be a fan of the Cable and Fallon show to get this one

After a record crop of entries, the prize for this year’s most convoluted Christmas-referencing Commons intervention goes to Labour frontbencher Iain Wright who asked Vince Cable yesterday (and this is only a bowdlerised extract): “Given that this is the season of good will…will the Secretary of State ask for permission from his Minister of State at least to undo his electronic tag a notch or two and will not BIS and DECC ministers snuggle up together to watch Strictly, eggnog in hand, and promise to come back in 2013 determined to focus on British enterprise… not departmental infighting and ministerial surveillance?”

Alan Bennett would make a great guest editor for the Today programme

Today's the day for new blood in the radio programme's editor's chair

The names of the guest editors lined up for Radio 4's Today show were released today. Between 27 December and New Year's Day, the 6am to 9am slot will be in the hands of the Nobel prize-winning geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, journalist Dame Ann Leslie, comedian Al Murray, poet Benjamin Zephaniah and the US philanthropist Melinda Gates, wife of Bill.

John Kampfner: I wouldn't think Tony wants to Spice up his life

I have a confession to make that will destroy what cred I ever had. I loved the Spice Girls. When my daughters were small, they would sit glued to the box watching the glammy, glitzy airheads. I was gutted when I couldn't come with them to a concert, but I did make it to a Destiny's Child gig.

Matthew Norman on Monday: Who's just
the man to replace Jeremy Hunt? Why, it's
John Whittingdale, of course!

The allegedly respected Thatcherite knows a thing or two about the media

Eyebrows have been raised over Michael Heseltine's appointment

Heseltine told to bang public and private heads together

Big business loved it, small business less so, but most agreed that while the economy could benefit long term, the current low to zero growth isn't going to enjoy a quick pick up from the Budget.

Thatcher was urged to let Liverpool fall into decline

Margaret Thatcher was privately urged by senior ministers to consign Liverpool to a fate of "managed decline" after the Toxteth riots and spend regeneration money elsewhere, according to official papers made public for the first time today.

Andy McSmith: Any politically embarrassing findings can just be ignored

The last time a government faced riots on the British mainland as widespread as last week's was in the summer of 1981, when trouble began in Brixton and spread to almost every major city in England.

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor