News The logo of Samsung Electronics is displayed on a glass door at their headquarters in Seoul on November 6, 2013. Samsung Electronics promised better shareholder returns, dismissed fears over smartphone market saturation and signalled a more aggressive acquisitions policy Wednesday at a rare analysts' briefing to boost its flagging stock price.

Samsung has posted its first fall in quarterly profits for more than two years, fuelling fears that the booming smartphone market may be reaching saturation.

LogMeIn drops free service, gives users 7 days to sign up for paid subscription services

The abrupt end to the popular remote access service has annoyed users

Carphone Warehouse gets 4G boost as sales climb over Christmas

British high streets might have felt the squeeze over the Christmas trading period, but consumer were still willing to splash out on smartphones, according to Carphone Warehouse.

A £100,000 painting has been stolen from the home of an 89-year-old woman who was fooled by a fraud scam

£100,000 painting by Samuel Palmer stolen along with jewellery in fraud scam

A £100,000 painting has been stolen from the home of an 89-year-old woman who was fooled by a fraud scam, Scotland Yard said.

Orange and T-Mobile's delayed EE IPO sparks fury in the City

City analysts have accused Orange and T-Mobile of “dithering” after they axed plans for a £10 billion flotation of EE.

Apple claim that the parental controls in their iOS operating system are strong

Apple will pay parents £20m over in-app purchases

Apple is to refund at least $32.5m (£20m) to customers whose children made in-app purchases without their permission, using the parents' iPhones or iPads. The technology firm reached a settlement with the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), following an FTC complaint that found many of Apple's child-friendly apps offered virtual goods and other chargeable items within the apps, costing anything from 99c to $99.99.

Jaeger reports record Christmas sales boosted by online shopping

Fashion retailer Jaeger took full advantage of its new website, as online sales jumped 57%, helping it to a record Christmas.

iPhone at 7: The 7 milestones that got us here

We take our pick of the seven biggest moments in iPhone history

Freyberg in 1991: a trained artist and a collector of objets d'art, she understood well the discipline and touch of the craftsman

Annabel Freyberg: Gifted writer and editor whose wit, taste, and brio enhanced the obituaries pages of 'The Independent'

Annabel Freyberg was, for 30 years, one of the most vivid and memorable figures in London journalism. An easy prose stylist and a sympathetic, sharp-eyed editor, she held senior editorial positions at The Independent (where she was deputy editor of the obituaries pages from 1995-99), the London Evening Standard, The World of Interiors, and the Daily Telegraph Magazine. She wrote with brio – and with a fresh, scholarly, and unexpected take – on fine and decorative arts, artists, interiors, houses and food. She published Ceramics for the Home (1999) and in recent years produced a handsome, quirky Teapot & Tea Calendar. That she should have delighted in teapots – the most practical, elegant but complicated product of the potter's art – was all of a piece with Freyberg, a trained artist and unfettered collector of objets d'art who understood the discipline and touch of a craftsman.

Richard Newton from Whitby was filmed by North Yorkshire Police driving with both of his hands on his head

Motorist filmed driving with his hands behind his head is banned

Man claimed he was stretching because of a bad back

CES Las Vegas 2014: Nvidia's K1 chip will give your smartphone better graphics than your console

The Tegra K1 also comes in a 64-bit variant and will be used to power self-driving cars

Cinema-goers may now be asked to keep their phones on, as a new app is trialed

Advertising app that sends sonic messages from the big screen has cinemas asking: Please switch on your phone

A prototype of the 'cinime' experiment using Ben and Jerry's ice cream as a sponsor, enabled audience members to win free tubs of ice cream

iPhone owners are smartest claims online test

Owners of Google's Nexus smartphones came second, with Blackberry users performing the worst in a series of brain-teasers

A mugger killed his accomplice after the bullet he fired at their victim bounced of his face

Bullet bounces off robbery victim’s face and shoots mugger dead

The teenager was shot dead after a bullet fired by his accomplice at a man they were mugging bounced off the victim’s face

The TomTom Go 6000

TomTom Go 6000 satnav review: Your smartphone might have GPS, but this device won't rack up roaming charges

David Phelan assesses whether anyone really needs a dedicated satnav now

Germany’s ‘Bild am Sonntag’ newspaper claims that President Obama knew that Ms Merkel’s phone had been tapped as early as 2010

Do you get phone calls from nowhere?

About a year ago, I began to recieve a wonderful series of calls from America and London

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine