Par Par Lay: Comedian who satirised the Burmese regime

It was always likely that Par Par Lay would spend his life entertaining people and poking fun. Born into a family of traditional entertainers, at the age of 14 he followed his father on to the stage as a performer of Ah Nyeint, a Burmese vaudeville-type entertainment that mixes humour and satire with dance and music. Performers would typically tour villages, customising their patter and jokes with local references. Yet over the years his jokes become increasingly biting and political, and he directed his barbs less towards local officials and more towards the military generals who exerted an iron grip on the country.

Marvin Miller: Sports executive who pioneered the concept of free

Marvin Miller was the founding executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association who led a revolution in sports by expanding the concept of free agency, which made many leading athletes multi-millionaires. "I loved baseball, and I loved a good fight, and, in my mind, ballplayers were among the most exploited workers in America" he wrote in his memoir, A Whole Different Ball Game.

The winners of the iQuiz first round

It was a blistering night of vital trivia in 18 student unions across Britain yesterday, as more than a hundred teams took part in the inaugural iQuiz.

Cabaret, Savoy Theatre, London

Rufus Norris's 2006 revival of this Kander & Ebb classic blew me away with its dark, fiercely energised and full-frontal vision of Weimar Berlin as a society gyrating its crotch at the edge of the abyss – at once a drug-fuelled hotbed of rampant, polymorphous perversity and a fertile seedbed for Nazism whose rise emerged in pointed conjunction with the spread of neurasthenic kinkiness.

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