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My Week Gresham College professor Doug McWilliams, whose day job is running the Centre for Economic and Business Research, has a habit in his lectures of dropping in factual nuggets that send a shiver down your spine, And as the theme of the series is how the world has to change under the impact of the biggest-ever economic shock – the rapid rise of Asia – he has lots of material.

City of London's grisly decapitated skull mystery solved using state-of-the-art forensic techniques

Archaeologists are thrilled at the blood-thirsty findings

Raise rates in 2014, urges leading City economist Douglas McWilliams

One of the City’s foremost economists will call this week for the Bank of England to lift interest rates as early as next February, assuming that the recovery continues.

An archaeologist digs out a skull from the site of the graveyard of the Bethlehem, or Bedlam, hospital

Crossrail tunnel project uncovers ancient burial ground - including Bedlam patients

Archaeologist for London rail programme say thousands of bodies of plague victims and asylum inmates could be uncovered, along with Roman road

Timber foundation beams from Roman building, Bloomberg Place

8,000 artefacts and rising: City dig pronounced the 'most important ever' in London

Archaeologists have nicknamed the site 'the Pompeii of the North'

Never mind the hunt for Richard III, what about Boudicca?

The search is on for warrior queen’s bones, once thought to lie beneath a McDonald’s

The best Christmas gifts for the gent

Main image: eclectic bronze shoe door stop by Tom Dixon, £145, Selfridges; selection of frames, from £5, John Lewis

Day tripper: Matthew Bell tries out the full regalia

My day as Lord Mayor of London

Before Roger Gifford becomes the 685th incumbent next month, Matthew Bell tries his luck in the footsteps of Dick Whittington

Pirates: The Captain Kidd Story, Museum of London Docklands, London

Not all 'Yo Ho Ho' and buried booty

An alternative way to enjoy the London Olympics

With under 400 days to go until the start of the London Olympics 2012, we have seen east London being transformed to accommodate a newly built stadium, the nominations for Torchbearers are coming in and test events are underway.

Urban explorers: A new festival celebrating street photography illustrates how technology is blurring the genre

Street photography has changed since Henri Cartier Bresson's day. So what place does it now have in a world awash with cameraphones? A new festival sets out to redefine an artistic institution

Hand-Drawn London, Museum of London

Maps lie. Or at least, the people who make maps lie. They use maps to show what they want to show, to say what they want to say. They make the Tube network less accurate but more navigable. They squeeze Africa and expand Europe. Even the London A-Z fibs, exaggerating the thickness of streets and shrinking parks to a green speck. Maps lie, but usually for a reason and often rather beautifully.

Hand-drawn London - picture preview

Cartography, in general, requires a degree of artistic licence. Drawing the shape and features of the Earth’s surface on a map is arguably less about creating an exact replica of it than about creating a useful tool by which to navigate it.

Digital Digest: 18/04/2011

The Best Of The Web

Museum of London displays Londoner's personal maps of the capital

If you were drawing a map of where you lived, what would you leave out and what would you include? Would you put in every street? Every house? Every tree? This question was posed last year by Londonist (www.londonist.com), a website that asked readers to send them their personal maps of London. The results – which included a map of central Hackney featuring every house – were so impressive that 11 of the maps collected are being displayed at the Museum of London later this month.

Street Cries: depictions of London’s poor

A new exhibition of prints and paintings at the Museum of London presents a diverse spectacle of the Capital's impoverised circa 1800.
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