Neil Young

Who lives in a house like this? An unlikely INXS fan

Who lives in a house like this? There's dirty laundry all over the floor, piles of records strewn around, life drawings hanging in the bathroom and war medals displayed on the walls. Why, it's Pete Doherty, of course, the free-spirited scamp. In a video recorded for NME's website, the 33-year-old musician gives viewers a tour of his cramped Paris apartment.

Dzeko deal ends City's window shopping

Edin Dzeko may make his Manchester City debut against Wolverhampton Wanderers on Saturday, according to his new manager, Roberto Mancini. Dzeko's signing was confirmed on Friday night but it was too late for him to participate in City's 2-2 FA Cup draw with Leicester City on Sunday, which he watched from the stands.

Ways to say goodbye

Corinne Bailey Rae's new album is suffused with sorrow over the death of her husband. Vini Reilly has recorded apaean to Factory Records legend Tony Wilson. The pain of bereavement can be heard in music, says Chris Mugan

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Album: Miles Benjamin Anthony Robinson, MBAR (Transgressive)

This week's contender for the "this year's Bon Iver" award is a mixed-race singer-songwriter from Brooklyn whose self-titled debut album shuffles from dark Neil Young-ish rock-outs to strung-out Bright Eyes-like campfire singalongs. Robinson has already attracted praise from Kyp (TV on the Radio) Malone while a couple of Grizzly Bears help out musically. There are tunes here catchier than his name and this fine, if at times disturbing record singles Robinson out as one to watch.

Neil Young: After the gold rush, the harvest

Sixties hippie, country-rock superstar, grunge godfather, modern protest singer... Neil Young's career is remarkable. Andy Gill gives thanks that the first segment of his huge retrospective is here at last

Booker T Jones: The king of Stax picks up his axe

With his band the MGs, Booker T was the resident genius at one of America's great soul labels. Now, with a bit of help from Neil Young, he's turning off his organ and enrolling in the school of rock

Album: Neil Young, Fork in the Road (Reprise)

For the past few years, Neil Young's hobby has been what's known as the Lincvolt project, converting his treasured 1959 Lincoln Continental to run on eco-fuels, the vehicle then being driven across the USA. Now, as is often the way with this most prolific and spontaneous of rockers, he's made a record about the experience – a single-issue album which, Neil being Neil, gets sidetracked occasionally into rants about whatever drifts across his radar. Both the title track and "Cough Up the Bucks" find him firing off weak salvoes at bankers and politicians, which reveal him to be no Robert Peston. Unfortunately, he's no scientific genius either, which renders the string of eco-car songs little more than bland automotive boogies, the sound of Fork in the Road being largely unvarnished blues-rock of undistinguished quality, ragged but nowhere near as glorious as he can deliver. "Johnny Magic" is a tribute to Jonathan Goodwin, his boffin partner in the Lincvolt business, while the funk-rock strutter "Fuel Line" is a lazy would-be eco-anthem too drab and clumsy to be adopted as a clarion call. "Just Singing a Song" touches on the nub of the problem with this album, Neil clearly believing his hands-on action is the way forward, and that "just singing a song won't change the world". Well, not this song. But isn't that what he does?