News America’s rise and fall: Occupy Wall Street protesers march through New York City in 2011

Individual debts collectively worth millions are abolished for just $400,000

New York City housing: Is this the issue that will win the mayoral race for Bill de Blasio?

Rents are sky-high, while homelessness is back at Great Depression levels

Doing nothing on US gun laws is no longer an option

Behind President Obama’s proposals, there looms a big question: in a nation of 80 million gun owners and roughly 300 million guns, will these changes make any difference?

The disputed Senkaku islands

China uses geology to challenge Japan on disputed islands

After making its first aerial incursion into Japanese-controlled airspace near disputed islands, China compounded tensions with Japan by bolstering its territorial claims at the United Nations.

Inside the mind of a troll

Following on from Gawker's expose of Violentacrez last week, Atlantic have published this heavyweight academic analysis of what exactly is going on in the mind of the "self-identifying trolls"

New contact lenses could cure short-sightedness

Good news for the young and squinty. A prototype contact lens that could cure short-sightedness by coaxing the eyeball to grow into a healthier shape has been unveiled by researchers in America. Gizmag takes a closer look.

Livestock drugs 'link' to obesity epidemic

Farmers may have fuelled the obesity epidemic by using antibiotics to fatten up livestock, a new study suggests.

University offer for Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng

The University of Washington has offered a fellowship to the blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng, who has said that he wants to study in the United States following his dramatic escape from house arrest.

Adam Yauch performs with the Beastie Boys at an MTV concert in 2004

Adam Yauch: White rapper who went from novelty act to genre-bending pioneer

Accused of appropriating rap music, Yauch likened it to the Rolling Stones playing the Blues

Thinking the Twentieth Century, By Tony Judt, with Timothy Snyder

In 1979 Tony Judt published an article with the unusual title "A Clown in Regal Purple". In a coruscating attack on "modernisation theory", he laid waste the methodology and reputation of a generation of number-crunching social historians. Within the bitchy world of scholarly politics it made him infamous, but few outside knew his name. His area of expertise was the history of socialism in France, a furrow he ploughed often and deeply.

James Franco is said to have only attended two out of 14 lectures

Professor 'fired for giving James Franco a D grade'

A university professor is claiming that he lost his job after he gave James Franco an embarrassing 'D' grade in a course he was teaching on account of the knock-'em-dead actor and perennial student showing up for only two out of the 14 lectures he was expected at.

Pockriss: Brill Building veteran

Lee Pockriss: Songwriter famed for his novelty hits

Lee Pockriss was one of the secret weapons in the pop business," says the singer and fellow Brill Building composer Paul Evans. "He wrote a lot of hit songs and yet nobody knows his name." While that is true, Pockriss's successes tended to be with novelty songs, notably "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polkadot Bikini".

Baruj Benacerraf

Baruj Benacerraf, who died on 9 August aged 90, was a Venezuelan immunologist who shared the 1980 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Climate change drives animals to high ground

Global warming is causing animals and plants to migrate further up mountains and away from the equator in attempts to avoid the higher temperatures associated with climate change, scientists have found in an exhaustive survey of nearly 1,400 species.

'Fat and fit live as long as slim'

People who are fat and fit live just as long as their slim counterparts and are less likely to die from heart disease, according to a new study.

Academy seeks to offer degree in troubleshooting

Business troubleshooters, aka company doctors,will be heading back to school if Christine Elliott gets her way. As chief executive of the Institute for Turnaround, Elliott is leading a plan to teach new recruits key skills needed to guide a business through tough times.

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A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border
Doris Lessing: Acclaimed novelist was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show

'A subversive brothel keeper and Communist'

Acclaimed novelist Doris Lessing was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show
Big Blue Live: BBC's Springwatch offshoot swaps back gardens for California's Monterey Bay

BBC heads to the Californian coast

The Big Blue Live crew is preparing for the first of three episodes on Sunday night, filming from boats, planes and an aquarium studio
Austin Bidwell: The Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England with the most daring forgery the world had known

Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England

Conman Austin Bidwell. was a heartless cad who carried out the most daring forgery the world had known
Car hacking scandal: Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked

Car hacking scandal

Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked
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Take your seat: 10 best placemats

Protect your table and dine in style with a bold new accessory