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Benefits rising for ‘Bake Off’ maker

Samuel Kasumu

Tory reformer warns PM: 'We must reach out to ethnic minorities'

In a new book, a No 10 adviser says the Conservatives have 'absolutely no policy or clear strategy' for attracting voters from BME backgrounds, and urges David Cameron to change tack – or suffer at the polls

Leading article: The Paralympics - faster, stronger, higher still

Equality requires a change of heart, which comes when language and culture change
Paralympics Team GB: the wheelchair rugby squad

Paralympics: The class of 2012

The British team has been set an ambitious target of 103 medals. Can it deliver, asks Robin Scott-Elliot

Performers at the Olympics Opening ceremony. Boyle’s extravaganza will be a hard act to follow for Hemmings and Sealey

You think it’s tough to follow Beijing? Try following Danny Boyle

The creative team behind the opening ceremony of the Paralympics are well aware of the challenge they face to outdo the Olympic gala, but they are ready

Where the games began: On 23rd July 1948, the day when the Olympic Games began at Wembley Stadium, spinal injury patients – for the most part injured Second World War soliders – met in the gardens of Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, for the first ever Stoke Mandeville Games. Their doctor, Ludwig Guttmann, had battled all manner of establishment figures to stage the games, which he recognised as crucial to restoring both his patients' health and their self-esteem. His efforts were noticed by the International Olympic Committee.

Key moments from the Paralympics past

How an Aylesbury doctor's idea to help injured servicemen recover from the Second World War spawned a festival of sport

Jonnie Peacock

Paralympic profile: Jonnie Peacock, sprinting

In one respect at least, Jonnie Peacock, has yet to catch up with Oscar Pistorius. “No, I haven’t managed to have a chat with Oscar since then,” he says. “It’ll be interesting to see what he thinks about me now.”

Paralympics: Keep up on TV

The BBC’s exemplary coverage of London 2012 means Channel 4 has a tough act to follow. But at least it can put aside concerns that its 500 hours of Paralympic coverage might be excessive.

Paralympic profile: Steve Brown, wheelchair rugby

Great Britain’s Wheelchair Rugby captain Steve Brown has a wicked sense of humour. When a Blue Peter presenter took part in a training session with the squad two years ago, he advised him to “lean forward when you’ve got the ball, to protect it.” Blue Peter shouldn’t have taken that tip at face value.

Shelagh Fogarty: A feast of humanity, talent and plain old grit

The last time I was in the same village as thousands of disabled people was on Easter Monday a couple of years ago. It was Lourdes in the South of France and there wasn’t much sport going on but, as I prepare to cover the Paralymic Games from London for BBC Radio Five Live, I suspect the two experiences will have something in common - and I don’t mean miracles.

Paralympic athlete Maya Nakanishi is one of Japan's most promising track and field athletes

The unusual superpowers: why the little nations thrive

What is it that makes a top Paralympic Team? Is it a world-class healthcare system and a vibrant economy? Is it something less tangible, such as an overwhelming desire to win and a fervent national pride? Or is there a simpler formula for success: making sure there is enough funding to go round?

The Business Matrix: Saturday 25 August 2012

Aga profits cool as sales fall

Stobart hit by weak demand

Eddie Stobart suffered a reverse yesterday when the trucking firm admitted that even the kings of the road have been affected by the recession.

Philip Hensher: Abolish all grades. Only then will GCSEs be useful for pupils and employers

One of the interesting things about the past week, as GCSE and A-level grades fell for the first time in more than two decades, was hearing outraged commentators saying that educational attainment shouldn't be subject to political manipulation. I quite agree. But what the hell do they think has been happening over the past quarter of a century?

Paralympics set to be a sell-out

The London 2012 Paralympics is set to be a sell-out but people should still expect to see some gaps in seating, chief executive Paul Deighton said today.

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