Oscar Wilde

Invisible Ink: No 81 - Harry Hodge

In the modern age of phone-tapping and the super-injunction, one wonders what Harry Hodge would have said about the right to privacy.

New play sheds light on Oscar Wilde's secret trysts

It was a balmy evening on 27 September 1894 when two men appeared at the front door of the Albion Hotel in Brighton and asked if they could rent a room. One was a young newspaper seller from Worthing named Alfonso Conway. His companion was Oscar Wilde.

The Cult of Beauty: the Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900, V&A Museum,

What should make the curve of a brow, or the cherry flush of a lip, beautiful? Why are peacocks' feathers, rich in delicate texture and iridescent colour so unlikely, so pointlessly extravagant? What can we learn from contemplating such things? The Cult of Beauty at the V&A explores "the Aesthetic Movement" in Britain, an umbrella term for groups of individuals working across the various artforms at the end part of the 19th century, who believed in beauty for its own sake. As an exhibition it manages a critical recouping of rather unfashionable Victorian art, and also makes an intellectual, historical case for corralling together such figures as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, James McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley and William Morris.

1065 and all that: Dave's Book of Dates

David Cameron has been criticised for a string of factual errors – from the date the US entered the Second World War to Iran's nuclear capability. David Randall imagines how the PM might tell the story of the past 2,000 years

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The Importance of Being Earnest, Open Air Theatre, Regent's Park,

Oscar Wilde's trivial comedy for serious people has a pronounced summery feel about it and is not as absurd a choice for the open air as it might first seem. But Irina Brown's revival is a spirited denial of the bosky surround, placing both Algernon's Half Moon Street apartment and the Manor House in Hertfordshire on a white disc with a white ramp and a white grand piano.