Paul Greengrass

Route Irish, Cannes Film Festival

After the comparative whimsy of Looking for Eric, Ken Loach is back in competition in Cannes with a very dark and muscular revenge thriller. Route Irish is an intricately plotted, fast-moving film with a strong political undertow. Loach and his regular screenwriter, Paul Laverty, are railing against the abuses perpetrated by Western private security contractors in Iraq. They are laying bare the obscenity of waterboarding and torture. In the final reel, though, the film lurches into vigilante territory – a Death Wish for the anti-war movement.

What really happened on Bloody Sunday?

Twelve years ago Lord Saville began his inquiry into one of the darkest chapters in the history of Northern Ireland. Now, £200m later, he will finally deliver his report

The best films never made

David Lean's Nostromo? Michael Powell's The Tempest? As Brighton's Cine City film festival celebrates the best movies that never made it to the screen, Emma Love explores why some projects just don't get finished

Birdsong: An epic in the making

Sebastian Faulks sold the film rights for his bestselling novel 16 years ago. Only now may shooting finally start on the sweeping wartime love story. Geoffrey Macnab pieces together a blockbuster saga with a cast of thousands

Watchmen returns: The 20-year struggle to bring a cult classic to the

When 'Watchmen' was published in 1987, it was hailed as the greatest graphic novel of all time – and Hollywood immediately snapped up the rights. Two decades later, after passing through the hands of some of the world's biggest-name directors, the $150m project has finally come to fruition. Tim Walker tells the inside story of a tortuous journey from page to screen

More headlines

James Nesbitt: This charming man

'Cold Feet' made him a household name and the nation’s favourite lovable rogue. But with a couple of heavyweight roles under his belt and a new conspiracy thriller about to air, James Nesbitt is ready to embrace the dark side