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Paul Weller

My Secret Life: Suggs, 51, musician

The household I grew up in... a very nice flat above Maples the carpet shop on the corner of Tottenham Court Road with my mum. It was a 10-minute walk to the heart of Camden Town and 10 minutes the other way to the heart of Soho.

The Bees, Bush Hall, London

The Bees are back and the world is suddenly a better place. It's three years since the blessed Isle of Wight sextet came up with a new album, which might be the blink of an eye compared with the timescale on which a Blue Nile or a Kate Bush operates, but for fans of these free-spirited embracers of soul, jazz, and psychedelia it's been an anxious wait.

The Eighties: Another country

From the Falklands and the miners' strike to Diana and Live Aid, it was a decade that changed our world. And the legacy of the Eighties lives on, argues Andy McSmith

Diary: Paul Hewson for PM

While Blair was long convinced that Brown would be a poor prime minister, he seems to have no such compunction about recommending Bono for a similar role. The U2 frontman, Blair writes (on page 555), "could have been a president or prime minister standing on his head. He had an absolutely natural gift for politicking, was great with people, very smart and an inspirational speaker... motivated by an abundant desire to keep on improving, never really content or relaxed. I knew he would work with George [W Bush] well, and with none of the prissy disdain of most of his ilk". Bono's nationality (not to say his tax arrangements) would preclude him from leading a British political party. One assumes he would also have to revert to his real name, Paul Hewson, to be taken seriously in high office. But familiarity with the world of finance would surely qualify him for leadership in Ireland: his investment fund, Elevation Partners, has been described as "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States".

Changing man: An audience with Paul Weller

Thirty years ago he was The Jam's angry young frontman. But if Paul Weller has mellowed with age, he's lost none of his edge. On the eve of a general election, the singer talks pop, politics and why he hates MySpace

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Album: Robert Wyatt, Shleep, (Domino)

Another batch of Wyatt reissues on cool-as-hats Domino, this time the dryish 'Old Rottenhat' (surely his most overrated hat) and 'Dondestan', plus the lovely 'Shleep' from a decade ago.

Album: Paul Weller, 22 Dreams (Island)

Paul Weller's return to Island Records for the first time since 2000's Heliocentric seems like a homecoming of sorts, especially so given the eclectic, engaged nature of his new album. 22 Dreams is like an old-school Island album from the label's Seventies heyday, progressive (but absolutely not prog-rock), tinged with jazz and folksy elements, alert to the turning seasons, capturing the rural breezes, open to hope and fellowship – and, most importantly, its soul rooted in thoughtful, occasionally inspired songwriting. For me, it's the best thing he's done – but then I never much cared for The Jam. Or The Style Council. Or much of his previous solo stuff.

Musical fallout: Pop goes the politician...

David Cameron's declaration that 'Eton Rifles' is his favourite song has prompted a furious response from Paul Weller. The truth is that politics and pop just do not mix. By Cahal Milmo and Andy McSmith