Arts and Entertainment

It says a lot about how seriously people take the Grammy Awards that a video of Taylor Swift's performance of All Too Well has attracted around 180,000 views, while a 28-second clip of it complete with high kicks from Street Fighter's Ryu has already clocked over 2.2 million.

Owen, Apekisheva, Segundo, English - classical review

Kings Place, London

Classical album reviews: Taverner Consort and Choir, Rolando Villazón, Sabine Liebner

Taverner Consort & Choir, Andrew Parrott "Carlo Gesualdo: Tenebrae Responses for Good Friday" (Avie)

Classical review: Alexei Volodin, Wigmore Hall, London

Suddenly it’s raining Goldbergs, with pianists queuing up to deliver their take on Bach’s majestic set of variations.

Liane Carroll, jazz review: 'Pure yet raw'

Ronnie Scott’s, London

Ian Lake was finally convicted of sexual offences in 1995, after years of abusing students

Decades of abuse by Royal College of Music piano teacher Ian Lake boosts demands for inquiry

Victims demand to know why Ian Lake was employed by Royal College of Music for so long

The Berlin Wall was built along the border between the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Federal Republic of Germany

Red Love: The Story of an East German Family, By Maxim Leo, trans. Shaun Whiteside

An illuminating look at life behind the Berlin Wall

The Weekend’s TV: The Muppets and Lady Gaga at Christmas (Channel 5)

Gaga outshone by the sensational,  inspirational, celebrational Muppets

’Tis the season for merry music – but is there too much of it?

Is there too much music surrounding us? In particular, I’m thinking of the seasonal offerings of Wise Men and Angels and Santa’s sleigh bells which constantly cloud the winter air on our high streets. As a musician, I’m supposed to love music, aren’t I? Can there really be too much of such a good thing?

Take That member and X Factor judge Gary Barlow has released his first solo album in 14 years

Gary Barlow, Since I Saw You Last: Album review

Sleek solo set shows that Gary’s back for good

Eric and Little Ern: Theatre review - 'funny and affecting'

Vaudeville Theatre, London

Rivers Pound has to pay an additional £120 for his 'spare' bedroom

The kidney patient subject to bedroom tax - even if room is used for dialysis machine

Plight of MP’s brother raises questions about fairness of controversial welfare reform

Margaret Hodge, the chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee, led the grilling of top executives

A new boom industry: coaching select committee witnesses for ‘ordeal by Hodge’

They have publicly humiliated former business titans from Rupert Murdoch to Bob Diamond, forced Starbucks to cough up £10m in tax and made villains of some of the world’s best-known brands. But corporate Britain is fighting back against Parliament’s newly invigorated inquisitorial committees by hiring highly paid specialist consultants to prepare executives for grillings by MPs.

Album review: Josephine Foster, I'm a Dreamer, Fire Records

This Spain and Colorado-based singer-songwriter’s wavering ethereal voice hangs in the air like cigar smoke and is curiously reminiscent of the theremin. It’s the perfect vehicle for carrying her timeless songs, which mix Tin Pan Alley jauntiness with New Orleans swing, then throws in a dash of country melancholy so that you never know quite where you are.

The beat goes on: Stan Tracey

London Jazz Festival: Different strokes for key movers

Kit Downes and Stan Tracey riff on the state of their art ahead of the London Jazz Festival

Classical review: Hodges, Currie, Summers, Aurora Orchestra, Ollu / Tamara Stefanovich

How far has ‘new music’ progressed since the Fifties? On the evidence of two magisterial Southbank concerts, scarcely at all. John Lennon’s borrowing (for “Strawberry Fields”) from Stockhausen’s “Gesang der Junglinge” was an indication of how deeply that pioneering electronic work had penetrated mid-century culture, and to listen to it now is to experience anew the freshness of its invention. This is best done with eyes shut, because what Stockhausen’s collage does is create a landscape bursting with events of an almost tactile nature. One’s initial impression is of being painlessly dive-bombed from all angles by flocks of excited birds, but that is just one of many evanescent effects emerging from the speakers round the auditorium.

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<p>Jonathan Ross</p>
<p>Jonathan Ross (or Wossy, as he’s affectionately known) has been on television and radio for an extraordinarily long time, working on a seat in the pantheon of British presenters. Hosting Friday Night with Jonathan Ross for nine years, Ross has been in everything from the video game Fable to Phineas and Ferb. So it’s probably not so surprising that Ross studied at Southampton College of Art (since rebranded Southampton Solent), a university known nowadays for its media production courses.</p>
<p>However, after leaving Solent, Ross studied History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, now part of the UCL, a move that was somewhat out of keeping with the rest of his career. Ross was made a fellow of the school in 2006 in recognition of his services to broadcasting.</p>
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Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

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Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

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New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

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Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

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Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

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Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

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Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
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