Arts and Entertainment

It says a lot about how seriously people take the Grammy Awards that a video of Taylor Swift's performance of All Too Well has attracted around 180,000 views, while a 28-second clip of it complete with high kicks from Street Fighter's Ryu has already clocked over 2.2 million.

Owen, Apekisheva, Segundo, English - classical review

Kings Place, London

Classical album reviews: Taverner Consort and Choir, Rolando Villazón, Sabine Liebner

Taverner Consort & Choir, Andrew Parrott "Carlo Gesualdo: Tenebrae Responses for Good Friday" (Avie)

Classical review: Alexei Volodin, Wigmore Hall, London

Suddenly it’s raining Goldbergs, with pianists queuing up to deliver their take on Bach’s majestic set of variations.

Liane Carroll, jazz review: 'Pure yet raw'

Ronnie Scott’s, London

Ian Lake was finally convicted of sexual offences in 1995, after years of abusing students

Decades of abuse by Royal College of Music piano teacher Ian Lake boosts demands for inquiry

Victims demand to know why Ian Lake was employed by Royal College of Music for so long

The Berlin Wall was built along the border between the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Federal Republic of Germany

Red Love: The Story of an East German Family, By Maxim Leo, trans. Shaun Whiteside

An illuminating look at life behind the Berlin Wall

The Weekend’s TV: The Muppets and Lady Gaga at Christmas (Channel 5)

Gaga outshone by the sensational,  inspirational, celebrational Muppets

’Tis the season for merry music – but is there too much of it?

Is there too much music surrounding us? In particular, I’m thinking of the seasonal offerings of Wise Men and Angels and Santa’s sleigh bells which constantly cloud the winter air on our high streets. As a musician, I’m supposed to love music, aren’t I? Can there really be too much of such a good thing?

Take That member and X Factor judge Gary Barlow has released his first solo album in 14 years

Gary Barlow, Since I Saw You Last: Album review

Sleek solo set shows that Gary’s back for good

Eric and Little Ern: Theatre review - 'funny and affecting'

Vaudeville Theatre, London

Rivers Pound has to pay an additional £120 for his 'spare' bedroom

The kidney patient subject to bedroom tax - even if room is used for dialysis machine

Plight of MP’s brother raises questions about fairness of controversial welfare reform

Margaret Hodge, the chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee, led the grilling of top executives

A new boom industry: coaching select committee witnesses for ‘ordeal by Hodge’

They have publicly humiliated former business titans from Rupert Murdoch to Bob Diamond, forced Starbucks to cough up £10m in tax and made villains of some of the world’s best-known brands. But corporate Britain is fighting back against Parliament’s newly invigorated inquisitorial committees by hiring highly paid specialist consultants to prepare executives for grillings by MPs.

Album review: Josephine Foster, I'm a Dreamer, Fire Records

This Spain and Colorado-based singer-songwriter’s wavering ethereal voice hangs in the air like cigar smoke and is curiously reminiscent of the theremin. It’s the perfect vehicle for carrying her timeless songs, which mix Tin Pan Alley jauntiness with New Orleans swing, then throws in a dash of country melancholy so that you never know quite where you are.

The beat goes on: Stan Tracey

London Jazz Festival: Different strokes for key movers

Kit Downes and Stan Tracey riff on the state of their art ahead of the London Jazz Festival

Classical review: Hodges, Currie, Summers, Aurora Orchestra, Ollu / Tamara Stefanovich

How far has ‘new music’ progressed since the Fifties? On the evidence of two magisterial Southbank concerts, scarcely at all. John Lennon’s borrowing (for “Strawberry Fields”) from Stockhausen’s “Gesang der Junglinge” was an indication of how deeply that pioneering electronic work had penetrated mid-century culture, and to listen to it now is to experience anew the freshness of its invention. This is best done with eyes shut, because what Stockhausen’s collage does is create a landscape bursting with events of an almost tactile nature. One’s initial impression is of being painlessly dive-bombed from all angles by flocks of excited birds, but that is just one of many evanescent effects emerging from the speakers round the auditorium.

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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

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The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

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Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

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Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence