Voices

50 years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas by an unknown gunman, we look into some of the more outlandish conspiracy theories that have arisen since his death.

Sacha Baron Cohen's 'Dictator' takes his camel out in Cannes

'The Dictator' knows how to make a scene.

Nicholas Lezard: Who cares who killed Kennedy?

These are the nut-jobs who believe Obama is a Muslim and the Jews were behind 9/11

Album: dEUS, Vantage Point (V2)

The accolade of being Belgium’s Top Band sounds like something of a back-handed compliment – and following the recent rise of Soulwax, indie-prog outfit dEUS may not even have sole claim on that distinction. And to be honest, Vantage Point doesn’t quite merit it, either.

Vantage Point, Nationwide

Vantage Point is not a movie of words. It is no Lions for Lambs. And Dennis Quaid is certainly no Tom Cruise. Yet, much like another post-9/11 picture, Rendition, the film's major event (a terrorist bomb going off) is witnessed by different characters, each with a different, subjective point of view. All this makes for edge-of-the-seat viewing. And while by the third or fourth rewind, my fellow cinema-goers were becoming restless, I would say that Vantage Point's nonstop symmetrical elegance is to be applauded.

Vantage Point, 12A

Keep it in your codpiece, Henry

Album: Bobby Conn with the Glass Gypsies

The Homeland, Thrill Jockey

COMEDY: GIG OF THE WEEK - Harvey Fierstein

tomorrow Adelphi Theatre, London

Now Clinton's DNA faces paternity test

IN A case of life imitating art imitating life, Bill Clinton's DNA was back in the news yesterday with reports that a 13-year-old Arkansas boy is waiting to find out whether what his mother has often told him is true: that he is the son of the President of the United States.

The Independent Recommends: Film

"WHAT WENT down on the way to the top," screams the poster for Primary Colors (left). After the Starr Report, you don't really have to watch Mike Nichol's rather respectful political satire to find out what did go down, but it still makes for entertaining viewing. John Travolta, as the sexually incontinent presidential candidate Jack Stanton, gives an uncanny impression of Clinton and Emma Thompson frumps it up as his wife. But the real acting honours go to Adrian Lester as the political ingenu who falls in and out of love with his charismatic boss.

tv political satire not `correct'

A NEW Blackadder-style sitcom set in the White House of Abraham Lincoln is the focus of the latest anguished US debate on political correctness, with programme makers fending off pressure from the black community and the Los Angeles city council to pull the show off the air even before it has its premiere tonight.

Travolta shows his true Primary Colors

CANDIDATE John Travolta arrives in American theatres next week. The film version of Primary Colors, the novel that set Washington on fire with its thinly veiled portrayal of the 1992 Clinton campaign, premiered in Los Angeles on Thursday night.

Film: Endgame

Andrzej Wajda chronicled some of the most turbulent moments in 20th-century Polish history. Now, the great auteur has lost his audience to Hollywood. By Geoffrey Macnab

Malcolm X daughter on murder-plot charge

The daughter of the murdered black radical Malcolm X has been arrested and charged with plotting to kill Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam organisation and sworn foe of her father before his assassination almost 30 years ago.

In the name of truth

The film In The Name of the Father about the Guildford Four cannot be described as a true story, the Advertising Standards Authority said.

Captain Moonlight: Careers that began in the name of the father

NOT for me, knee-jerk reaction and analysis; the Captain plays a longer game. Let me give you an example. Last week, in perusing a profile, I noticed that Gerry Robinson, the go-and- LWT-getting Granada chief executive, reviled by the creative tendency in television as a mere moneymaker, had studied for holy orders. Which set me thinking: there are a lot of them about, these people who had thoughts of shepherding God's flock before turning their energies elsewhere, aren't there? Tom Cruise, for example, spent time in a Franciscan seminary. Martin Scorsese also studied for the priesthood. George Carman, QC, that master of the courtroom, studied at a Lancashire seminary. A N Wilson, that master of the immediate and arresting cri de coeur, is another, as is Barney Curley, the consummate gambler, and Paddy McAloon, of the noted rock band, Prefab Sprout. And Michael Brunson. And Jack Dee. And John Hume. And Mark Tully. And Thomas Keneally. And, curiously, Dr James Sehn, the doctor who reunited John Wayne Bobbitt with that famous missing bit of himself. Something to think about on a Sunday morning, I should say.
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