Sport
Coach's thorough approach, including use of underwater treadmills, helped earn victory

Caught in the Net: The Peel deal for LCD Soundsystem

On 29 June, just after playing Glastonbury, LCD Soundsystem (below) headed to a studio in south London and spent the day playing songs from across their back catalogue.

Investment Column: Pru has work to do to regain our trust

Great Portland Estates; Charles Stanley

Peter Broderick, St Giles Church, London

Peter Broderick is a precocious but not yet wholly formed talent. The 23-year-old was plucked from obscurity in Portland, Oregon to the relative spotlight of the Danish experimental rock band Efterklang. Broderick left everything behind to move to Copenhagen, with a restlessness also apparent in his own music. Piano instrumental albums bashed out in an hour were joined in 2008 by a considered LP of guitar-based songs, Home. Virtuoso, singer-songwriter, sideman or star? The acclaim for his new mini-album, How They Are, and the reverent attention from the crowd packed into this beautiful 18th-century Soho church suggest that Broderick doesn't need to decide.

Thrill seekers - The transience of earthly pleasures

The latest group show organised by All Visual Arts sees artists such as the Chapman Brothers, Polly Morgan and Paul Fryer contributing works looking at the impermanence of pleasure when viewed from the perspective of death.

A prairie-sky landscape right on our doorstep

Britain has some remarkable places. If we discovered them on the other side of the world, we'd soon be writing home. Film-maker and novelist Tom Connolly explores parts of Kent that have fuelled his creativity

Horse Feathers, The Luminaire, London

Portland quartet Horse Feathers are defined by their folk-inspired string arrangements – a complex layering of acoustic guitar, violin, banjo and cello, blended together for a contemporary take on Americana. Songwriter and front man, Justin Ringle, artfully captures a mosaic of Prairie pioneers, Dust Bowl migrants, bare-feet cabin dwellers and the spirit of Frontierism. Each song is a lyrical artifact, a doleful southern Gothic retelling of the displacement of human emotions and feelings shot through a naturalistic landscape of past existences and faded American tradition.

Man injured in 'tombstoning' accident

A man was rushed to hospital after tombstoning from a rocky outcrop on a stag weekend, coastguards said today.

Modest Mouse, Picture House, Edinburgh

Although they've maintained a small but devoted following in indie circles for more than a decade and a half, Portland-based alternative outfit Modest Mouse were first held up as a cause célèbre by the UK press in 2007, with the release of their fifth album, We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank. Never mind the fact that it reached No 1 in America – it was the induction of guest guitarist Johnny Marr into the band which saw Modest Mouse and their catalogue welcomed into the British rock canon.

The Dandy Warhols, Koko, London

Real music lovers are supposed to treat greatest hits albums with disdain, but surely few will be as welcome as The Dandy Warhols' recent retrospective.

Leading article: Sweet sculpture

Contemporary art is often characterised as intensely international. So it is perhaps remarkable how many of the proposals for a work of art to grace the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square seem to have made reference to the British national spirit.

Scott is GB's sole ray of sunshine

A single shaft of heartwarming gold broke through the cold, grey, rain-heavy clouds over Weymouth Bay as Giles Scott turned master of the multi-medalled Ben Ainslie in the final race of the Skandia Sail for Gold Olympic regatta.

Caught in the Net: The trouble with Monae

Janelle Monae has received admiring glances from all sides for her boho-futurist sound, style and general outlook. "Tightrope", the opening single from her acclaimed LP The ArchAndroid, has made a strong bid for the year's best song.

Prophet of bad taste: John Callahan was a comic genius who left no taboo unbroken

Callahan's cartoons won him a cult following. He was also a remarkable, brave human being. Robert Chalmers pays tribute

Ainslie steps into the breach on a mixed day for GB sailors

It was Ben Ainslie to the rescue in Weymouth on Thursday when the triple gold medallist went to the aid of Argentinian 49er pairing Sebastian Peri-Brosa and Federico Villambrosa.

Olympic legacy factor gets Dorset buzzing

Across the bay, families, couples and friends were enjoying the laid-back traditional delights of a typical, sunshine and clouds British summer holiday, including donkey rides on the sands, but a couple of miles away there was tension in the air. Olympic tension.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003